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  1. #1
    Senior Member bamme's Avatar
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    Hi people

    im quite experienced in web graphics but dont know much about print.
    I have to design a logo, businesscard and letterhead(!) and I have designed the logo in Illustrator.
    I have 2 questions:

    1) How do I correctly set up this document for print? I have set the colour mode to CMYK - but thats as much as I know!
    2) There are some sections/blocks of colour in the logo that overlap each other - for web, only one colour shows, but for print I think itd be the case that both colours would be printed one ontop of another - how would I make one section that overlaps the other cancel out the underneath sections colour? I have heard about 'Knocking out'.. not sure if this applies..
    I cant attach the file as a zip because its too big but you can download it at
    www.ameliealden.com/stf/logo.zip

    Would be so grateful of some help here.. completely lost!

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  3. #2
    Member Breezy's Avatar
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    use CMYK color mode, leave about 1/4 inch of bleed room on all four edges, and start your work in at least 300 dpi
    Utah Web Design { Pimpin(it); } - ENJOY yo-self

  4. #3
    Senior Member bamme's Avatar
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    Thanks.. Is that it? I've heard a bit about spot colours too.. Do I need to know about those too and does anyone here know?

    Thanks 4 continuous support

    Emma

  5. #4
    Member Breezy's Avatar
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    basically it's just a principle you need to take into account while you work:
    A spot color by definition is simply base ink color used in printing. You already know the four standard spot colors; Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK, right? So MOST print shops will just use those... however, if you have a high end client who wants their materials to pop like the fourth of july and they have a print shop lined up that will do hexachromatic printing (that's CMYK plus Orange and Green) by all means go for it. One thing is that you run the risk of more and more problems the more spot colors involved, so my advice is just to stick with CYMK unless your client DEMANDS otherwise :-) As for your layering issue, I don't think illustrator will have any problems correctly sorting out the printing instructions to match what you see in the editor.
    Utah Web Design { Pimpin(it); } - ENJOY yo-self

  6. #5
    Senior Member bamme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breezy
    basically it's just a principle you need to take into account while you work:
    A spot color by definition is simply base ink color used in printing. You already know the four standard spot colors; Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK, right? So MOST print shops will just use those... however, if you have a high end client who wants their materials to pop like the fourth of july and they have a print shop lined up that will do hexachromatic printing (that's CMYK plus Orange and Green) by all means go for it. One thing is that you run the risk of more and more problems the more spot colors involved, so my advice is just to stick with CYMK unless your client DEMANDS otherwise :-) As for your layering issue, I don't think illustrator will have any problems correctly sorting out the printing instructions to match what you see in the editor.
    Wow doesn't seem all that complex at all. With this card I'm designing ill need use of transparency effects (a 50 prcent transparent layer and a drop shadow) I've heard about flattening - I'm using indesign - any tip or gd knowledge ource or is this eassy too?

  7. #6
    Member Breezy's Avatar
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    flattening is just generally a good practice for two big reasons:
    1: it protects your work from having useful elements cannibalized by designer-rapists.
    2: If the print shop doesn't have adobe suite (weird, right?) you'll need to put it in a common format, and most all of those are flat... it's ok to have white replace your transparancy since printers see white as nothing/negative space.
    Utah Web Design { Pimpin(it); } - ENJOY yo-self

  8. #7
    Senior Member bamme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emmaburge
    Wow doesn't seem all that complex at all. With this card I'm designing ill need use of transparency effects (a 50 prcent transparent layer and a drop shadow) I've heard about flattening - I'm using indesign - any tip or gd knowledge ource or is this eassy too?

    Thanks for all the help breezy, sounds so simple now! Flattening seems quite complex when you read about it are there any good tutorials? And is that true, white will just come out transparent?

    What when you actuially want to print white..?

    On my card, will everything white come out transparent?

    Only finding it hard to grasp as a pdf ebook said there's various ways to flatten, you should do it in illustrator first if using illustrator images, you should 'embed within illustrator'.. And a few other things

    Thanks so much for answering my qs

    Emma

  9. #8
    Member Breezy's Avatar
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    all flattening is is just merging all your layers together. The reason they say you should merge all your illustrator layers together in illustrator first is that illustrator is vector based, so you would want to take those parts into whatever other applications you need them for, with as much of the original paths intact as possible. You may or may not know yet that vector graphics are rendered geometric formulae, while pixel graphics are dot by dot representations of grid coordinates. So it naturally follows that a pixel application won't quite know what to do with a vector path and vice versa - thus when you try to resize or otherwise tweak a graphical type within it's opposite application you often get distortion that will make your stuff look crappier than necessary.
    Utah Web Design { Pimpin(it); } - ENJOY yo-self

  10. #9
    Senior Member bamme's Avatar
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    Thanks v much - all seems pretty straightforward which is kinda worryingly good as I've downloaded this pdf ebook (its actually for indesign and illustrator 2..) which is saying things like:

    " The flattener must work with high resolution images on disk which means that DCS files and an OPI workflow both of which rely on importing low res images that get swappd out with high res later are out."


    Havent got a clue what DCS or OPI mean..
    Do you? Do you think i should download a more uptodate ebook and where I could prhaps find one?


    (How do i credit you for being so helpful??)
    Emma

  11. #10
    Senior Member bamme's Avatar
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    I just finished these:

    www.ameliealden.com/indesign.zip

    (yep theyre indesign not illustrator) but i wondered if you could check over them to see if i got all right or i need to change anything (for print purposes) - the istock photo is there temporarily

    Thanks if you can do that thatd be amazing. then ill shut up

    Emma


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