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  1. #1
    Lor
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    Am I supposed to be writing code to put data into my database, as well as taking it out and such? I am using the webmonkey tutorial and I am so clueless about this subject that I can't even follow this most basic guide.

    I have, in my control panel of my site, a page titled "MySQL Database", but all this allows me to do is name the DB, and modify it with phpMyAdmin. The first thing it asks me to to do is make a table, and I have no idea what's going on here, and I don't think this what first need to do (since the tutorial I am following doesn't go into making tables right away). Does the fact that I have these things (MySQL Database, and phpMyAdmin) mean I dont need to go throught such things as an installation? How do I put data in here?


    What's stumping me at the moment is that the Webmonkey guide is trying to tell me how to put information into my database by using code. I have absolutely no notion of of how to use codes in this way.Here's a link to the page of the guide I am on at the moment.

    Cam anyone explain to me what this guy is trying to communicate?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    Yes... I think you should look for a general guide on databases in general to see how they are structured. phpMyAdmin is a GUI for mysql - and will let you do all that you need. However, you can do everything you do with phpmyadmin with php (or capabale coding language) If phpMyadmin works - mysql is installed and working correctly - no need for that.

    It's very difficult and all I can relaly offer is to go slow. Once you understand the basics, it will go much quicker.. It's the diving into it that's the hardest part.
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
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  4. #3
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    You can use the "mysql" tool (mysql.exe on Windows) to enter raw SQL statements. Be sure to end each statement with a semicolon (not sure if that's an ANSI SQL thing or not).
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  5. #4
    Lor
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    So, I have this phpMyAdmin tool to help me with MySQL. Is it advisable to get a good working knowledge of PHP before even trying to head into MySQL through the phpMyAdmin tool?

  6. #5
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    I would suggest so as mysql's main purpose is web-based applications (although can be used for many other things). It's your choice... chances are you wont be learning much PHP without mysql as they're almost stuck together at the wrist
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
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  7. #6
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    First off, a table contains fields that hold the data. If there are no tables, there are no fields. If there are no fields, there is no where to put the data!

    Get MS Access, or any relational database program that has a built-in query builder. Better yet, install MySQL on yor home computer, then install MySQL Control Center. After you create the tables in control center, enter a few columns/fields. You can right click on the table and have MySQL Control Center generate the SQL code that it would take to create it in PHP out on your host.

    After you create the tables, Then you can add data to them. Man, you definitely need a book!

    Try picking up a book on SQL (acronym for Structured Query Language). That is the basis of the "code" that you are not understanding in that webmonkey tutorial. SQL lets you use words to select and manipulate data without a graphical interface. Without SQL, your PHP code is going to be flat - making you resort to saving your data into text files. No fun!!

    I agree with Brak on going slowly. However, I think Brak was implying in his last post that you shoud learn both PHP and SQL at the same time(?). I disagree if that was the case.

    If you're trying to get data stored, read, and manipulated in a database, learn SQL first! At least with SQL, you'll be able to enter statements that will create tables or get information from them.

    Learning PHP will be a snap compared to SQL. Also, if you plan on using other types of application servers (like ASP, ColdFusion, CGI/Perl), you're still going to need the SQL for doing the same stuff with databases.

    Good luck on your journey!


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