Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    87
    Member #
    10945
    Gobble! Gobble!

    First question is..do big (or medium) companies hire more people with maybe 2-3 years of freelance background compared to a student fresh from college who literally has spent 2 of his 4 years learning how to become a digital media worker? (in many colleges somewhere layered in the academic strata of "Communications", "Art", or "Computer Sciences" there are programs that focus solely on Web Design 101) Let's say that both applicants for the job have a portfolio of work.. who would get the full-time job in most cases?

    Second question..if you had the freedom of choice what type company would you prefer to work at, considering that it would also increase your chances of actually getting hired and branching off into other media production fields within that company?

    • A marketing/technology company (that specializes in interactive advertising)


    • At a video game distribution company like EA


    • A small video game developer house


    • Film company like Lucasfilm


    • A TV commercial production house


    Thanks.

  2.  

  3. #2
    Senior Member Jack000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    250
    Member #
    7173
    1 - The person with experience would most likely be hired. Employers not only look at talent, but proven communication and teamwork skills. If you have no previous commercial experience, I would suggest finding a good company and apply for an internship. This is a great way of getting experience and may lead to a permenant position.

    2 - I think the most versatile position in a media production company is concept development. Try to find a position that not only hones your technical skills, but allows for creative freedom - because that's the skill that will transfer to almost all other fields.

    Game development and film require a broad range of skilled individuals. For example, EA will have 3d modellers, animators, programmers, sound engineers, game testers (terrible job actually), marketing people, and many others. These are very diverse and specific disciplines and often not transferable to other areas.

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    87
    Member #
    10945
    Thanks Jack!

    Is anyone familiar with other media production fields that web/Flash designers commonly jump to (for a sensible career change), or are there potential creative positions that are good to reach for in the online media production industry (such as an art director) when you've proven your skills as an entry-level designer?

  5. #4
    Senior Member DanielOliver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Cornwall, England.
    Posts
    1,202
    Member #
    1879
    If you start taking on work now alongside your education you can finish with both experience and a decent portfolio. If you have good quality work in your portfolio that will speak for itself.

    As for working at a company? For me I always see the best option is working for yourself. Although hard at first and some may say it's risky, you can't beat being your own boss. Working for yourself, making money for yourself. I'm talking about web design here. I don't know about the other areas you are asking about. I imagine some are very difficult to start your own company in.

    What you do for what company is really down to what your area of expertise happens to be. I wouldn't say there one is better then the other? Perhaps some are in higher demand at the moment but the areas you have posted above really are very different areas. Each involve different skill sets and technical know how.

  6. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    87
    Member #
    10945
    Why is it better to "just" work for yourself? Wouldn't it be wise to start at a company first, put some years into it, work at another company and then you've gathered up enough skills, connections, and saved-up money (hopefully) to do your own thing full-time?


  7. #6
    Senior Member DanielOliver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Cornwall, England.
    Posts
    1,202
    Member #
    1879
    That's why I am saying take on work while at college/uni or where ever you are studying.

    I'm not saying jump straight into it, that would be stupid. I'm saying take on work along side your education so you can put together a decent size portfolio and gain some good experience before you even look to work for a company. This was my answer to your first questions. Employers look for experience, but that doesn't mean that youngsters can't go into that interview with little experience. By starting now you could have a couple years experience behind you before you even start.

    There were two different points there in my post for your two different questions. It's just my personal opinion anyway. There will be people that will say work for a company.

    Personally I plan to go into full-time work and run my own company. It's what I have been working towards for the past 3-4 years and I am now just about in the position where I could do this full-time for myself and do relatively well from it. I think that now I have 3-4 years experience this would be good enough if I decided I wanted to go and work for someone else rather then myself.

    Both have their pros and cons.

    Working for yourself means you call your shots. Your not working for a boss and your not working to earn your boss money. Your working for yourself so things are more flexible and you call the shots. You choose the direction you are going to take your company, your work, what work you take on, what clients you work with. The downside to this is that there is always that risk that there isn't enough work coming in all the time. It can be a bit of a roller coaster ride. Who's going to pay the bills if you go through a quiet patch?

    Working for another company means you have a regular income all the time no matter what they are doing. You don't have to worry about finding the work, they do it for you. The downside to this however is the money is not as good as working for yourself could potentially be.

    Many recommend starting to work at a company first and get some years under your belt. It's a good idea if your not confident enough to go out on your own. It's just not something that currently tickles my fancy. But my word isn't law.


Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:22 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com