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  1. #1
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    The competition to become the next markup language for the Web is heating up. This article takes a look at what's cool and what's uncool about the competing technologies.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    Read the rules about advertising.

    There's no such thing as XHTML 5, nor HTML 5. HTML is dead; XHTML is what's being used, and way in the future, just XML.

    The XHTML 2 standard is months, if not years, away from reaching any final official status, and many years away from being accepted by browser manufacturers (no doubt especially Microsoft) given how much breaks between XHTML 1.1 and XHTML 2.0 (forms are dead, frames are long dead, even the <a> tag is dead).
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Steax's Avatar
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    In other words any, err, "new" language they introduce will probably take over at least 3 years from now. Nothing to panic about. It'll take at least a year for the language to be official, about 3-5 for browsers to update & spread, and about 2 more years before all web designers start using it (look at how long it took for CSS to spread - and CSS is something really big).

    So I guess if you're planning to sleep in a cave for a few years, then sure you'll need to learn them. Otherwise, not yet.
    Note on code: If I give code, please note that it is simply sample code to demonstrate an effect. It is not meant to be used as-is; that is the programmer's job. I am not responsible to give you support or be held liable for anything that happens when using my code.

  5. #4
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    But then again, being too eager to say things don't exist is probably a bad thing. The Web Applications 1.0 specification, which is being drawn up by the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) is indeed an extension of (X)HTML. WHATWG is a coalition of people from places like the browser developers who are working to come up with specifications that are more `in tune' with web development needs. The Web Applications spec is where the HTML canvas element came from, and the reason it suddenly appeared in Firefox and Safari.

    The supporters of Web Apps 1.0 tend to call it HTML 5, since it's an evolution of HTML (compatible with XHTML), rather than an evolution of XML.

    According to wikipedia, the major contributors to WHATWG are Google, the Mozilla Foundation, Opera, and Apple. Their problem being precisely that the W3C is taking too long to move in an arena that moves too fast.

  6. #5
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, I want companies (for profit) developing web standards instead of an independent organizations.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  7. #6
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    When they present their standards through an accepted body like the W3C (which is what they do -- Web Forms is, in large part, their idea), they have far more pressure to actually please their customer base (and in this context, we the web developers are their customers), and when they are accompanied by organizations that are not quite for profit (like the Mozilla Organization), and finally when they are made up of people who both know the difficulty of implementing what they're suggesting and who know whether it would be useful in their own design work or not, then yes, yes, I want them developing web standards. :-P

  8. #7
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    My point, though, is that those who develop the standards should not be the same people as those who develop the products using those standards.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  9. #8
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    In general, I think I agree. But at the same time, if it's a group of such people who develop those products, then there's less of a problem. The missing piece here is, of course, Microsoft. If all the major vendors are agreeing on a standard, it is at least possible that it will be come a de facto standard as well as a de jure one. Naturally, however, we know that Microsoft helping to make a standard doesn't mean they'll follow it, as they have proven in the past.

  10. #9
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    Actually the W3C is much more commercial than the WHATWG. All the standards made by the W3C are done almost exclusively by companies -- the W3C is company-funded, all the working group members are company members, and the voting rules are simply "one vote per company". On the other hand, the WHATWG is completely open (http://whatwg.org/), there's an open mailing list where everyone, including you, is welcome to send feedback, where all feedback is treated based on its merits, and where companies have no power, only people have power. We have a totally open blog, an open wiki, an open IRC channel (#whatwg on Freenode), three open mailing lists (one for web designers, one for implementors, and one for those interested in helping develop the specification), and every draft of the spec is immediately available on the Web site. Furthermore, there is a guarentee that all e-mail sent to the WHATWG will get a reply.

    I hope this helps clarify matters. If you have any questions or feedback (e.g. about the spec) feel free to mail me directly (ian@hixie.ch) or to e-mail one of the lists (http://whatwg.org/mailing-list).

    (Disclaimer: I'm the editor of the WHATWG specs.)

  11. #10
    Senior Member tonyf12's Avatar
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    I read somewhere that all the open source people were supporting the whatwg and it is really stupid removing forms and the <a> tag, how do you link or recieve information.


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