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  1. #11
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    Ada

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  3. #12
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    Why? What's interesting about it to you?

  4. #13
    Senior Member Eddy Bones's Avatar
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    I'm stuck learning Coldfusion for work because that's what the school's site is built with. *Sigh* Admittedly my interest is low, but if they're paying me to study it I'm not going to complain. I just don't like the idea of learning another loosely-typed language where you can throw your code in anywhere. I began my programming foray with PHP as a hobbyist and learned some bad habits, and I'm just now (two or so years later) growing out of them and learning better ways. I don't need another language giving me opportunities to butcher my otherwise decent practices.

  5. #14
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    Just because a language is dynamically typed, doesn't mean it encourages bad practices. It's the community that does that Take Ruby as my favorite example: the Ruby community emphasizes good code, separation of concerns, avoiding permature optimization, test-driven (or behavior-driven) development, and a bunch of other excellent practices. It's hard to learn Ruby to proficiency without getting `infected' with those ideas.

  6. #15
    Senior Member Eddy Bones's Avatar
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    My main problem isn't with it being dynamically typed - I worded my sentiment wrong. It's that they give you no reason to abstract your logic from the presentation. The same applies to PHP. By default they don't have any special way of making tiers like in ASP.NET or other languages. For example, you either know what the heck a data access layer is and does and you make it, or you forget about it. They give you no reason to make one. In ASP.NET, on the other hand, it's easy to make a DAL and it simplifies your development. I can't imagine not making it in a .NET web site or application.

    Of course I should mention that I'm speaking with limited knowledge of languages and only referencing the two that I'm most familiar with - PHP and ASP.NET.

    And on the other hand, there's no excuse for not knowing the basic concepts of tiered applications and not incorporating that knowledge, but some languages make it more of a necessity. But hey, for all I know it might come down to frameworks, too.

  7. #16
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    Very true. But then again, for a quick throwaway site, maybe you don't want to build an n-tier, distributed architecture with fully tricked-out SOAP web services support and a cluster of 16 J2EE servlet containers and 16 database servers distributed over a 32-node network. Right tool, right job, as it were.

    Erlang, for example, is what I intend to have as my ace-in-the-hole for applications that lend themselves to distribution and concurrency very well.

  8. #17
    Senior Member simpleurl's Avatar
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    Code:
    HAI
    CAN HAS STDIO?
    VISIBLE "LOL CODE IZ EAZY, but for counterstrikers and irc boys!"
    KTHXBYE

  9. #18
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    :-D

  10. #19
    Senior Member Eddy Bones's Avatar
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    I just bought Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmers' Guide, Second Edition last night. This is because I was sitting around at church with my laptop for a few hours the other night before service and had decided to play with Ruby a little. Well, I liked what I played with, and I've heard so many good things about the language. So I'm giving it a go. If nothing else it will give me something to do at my crap job at which they pay me to sit and do nothing.

  11. #20
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    Woo! That trusty book is still by my side right now Right on top of Programming Erlang and Agile Web Development with Rails


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