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  1. #1
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    Im just starting up learning coding, and my skills are extremely limited, im a budding entreprenuer, coming up to the end of my degree and i have a few web ideas i would like to get started, if you are interested in working on startups in exchange for equity in the final company then please get in contact and i will talk you through my ideas

    Nick

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  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Hi Nick. Forgive me for being harsh, but I'm doing this for a very good reason. I'm going to save you and whoever your potential partner is a whole lot of time and agony here.

    You're obviously young and inexperienced. There's nothing wrong with that in and of itself...we all start out young and inexperienced, and we learn from that and grow old and hopefully experienced. But being young and inexperienced means that you probably haven't seen the type of offer that you're making right here and right now, or at least not very often. I'll tell you first hand that I've not only seen the offer several times, but I've rejected it personally several times. And here's why:

    1) The partner isn't willing to invest, either in the site idea or in my labor. I don't mind taking a base deal plus a cut of sales as an incentive, but if I'm going to form a partnership, I'll generally form a partnership of one and do everything by myself and for myself.

    Right now, you don't seem to be willing to invest. Again, this is common. And anyone worth his/her salt is likely going to reject you because (s)he's too busy with guaranteed-money projects to take a risk on something like this. This leaves either the people who have something to prove (those people are few and far between) or the wannabes who know how to use PHP to retrieve info from a database and think they're genius programmers.

    2) The ideas are usually either pie-in-the-sky or poorly thought out in terms of execution. The partner thinks the idea is so great that the concept is equivalent to the execution, and this isn't the case.

    I can't judge your ideas because I haven't heard them. But if they're anything like most ideas (usually some form of Internet marketing that's been done to death and/or involves a get-rich-quick element or some other one-sided trading proposition), they probably need some work.

    My personal favorite was a guy I met in 2001 who wanted me to build a site to sell coupon books for local businesses and I would get a cut of the sales in exchange for my work in building the site. No upfront payment, just a cut of sales. Never mind the fact that online coupon codes were just starting to gain in popularity at this point...this guy's coupon book actually consisted of coupons that he clipped from flyers and newspapers! He was actually going to send people stapled-together booklets of coupons out of flyers and newspapers, and they were going to pay him for the privilege, or so he thought. I wasn't able to go to sleep until 4 in the morning the night before due to a heavy workload and I met him at 10 that morning, but even I could smell that scam.

    3) Neither partner is close enough physically to the other partner to make a partnership work legally and effectively. I don't give a damn what anyone says about a "global economy", I want to know what kind of person I'm dealing with, and the only way I'm going to find that out is face-to-face.

    Right now, most people don't know where you are. I do because I'm a mod, but most don't. And that's a high-risk, low-reward proposition for both sides.

    There are quite a few other reasons, but these three would suffice as individual reasons. Short version of what I posted...the person doing the coding usually loses on the deal, and the person who comes up with the ideas usually loses as well.

    Nick: the best thing you can do for yourself is to either start building sites yourself or get involved with a company that does them as an intern or a low-level employee. Learn how they build sites. Learn what works. Learn what doesn't. Learn some of the technology yourself. That way, you'll have a much better idea of what you want to build and what will work vs. an idea without the experience factor to back it up.
    bozzie123 likes this.
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  4. #3
    Junior Member
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    I am rather inexperienced within the programming field, but when it comes to marketing and other elements of business i have a wide range of skills, having completed marketing plans for several small and medium sized businesses within the past 3 years and they have gone on to reach all of their first and second year targets.

    Do you have any advice of where i should start to learn programming? any good books?/

    Nick

  5. #4
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Honestly? Just dive into it. The coolest aspect of web programming is also its biggest drawback...it's relatively new. Therefore, it's sparsely documented and much of the documentation is either dated or incorrect. It might take looking at 7, 8, 9 different sites to solve a problem, and it definitely will take you years to master. And if you get stuck, ask in here. There's usually someone in here who knows something about just the major languages and frameworks (HTML, CSS, Javascript, AJAX, jQuery PHP, ASP, ASP.net)

    One thing you'll want for sure is a good text editor with syntax highlighting (this color-codes your code, making it much easier to debug). Notepad++ is a good one. Visual Web Developer Express is a terrific editor if you go down the Microsoft technology route. And both are free.

    Hopefully that gets you started.
    bozzie123 likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)


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