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  1. #1
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    Since its officially the kick off of summer with Memorial Day here in the states i typically do a BBQ session with friends and family. So in light of the spirits i have posted a great guide on how to smoke pork if you want to try!!

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Basic Pulled Pork Smoke[/COLOR]




    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Choice of meat:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]I use bone in Pork Shoulder Ė Boston Butt for my pulled pork. They range from 5 to 9 pounds. I find mine at Samís club cryo-packed with two butts per pack. Sometimes you can find them in supermarkets, or if you have a source at a meat wholesaler you can get them there. Some folks use a fresh pork picnic which is the Butt (Shoulder) and the upper front leg bone together. They are larger than the Butt alone.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Preparation:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]About 12 hours before the meat goes in the smoker, trim a little if desired (I usually donít), apply a coating of your rub of choice, and wrap in plastic wrap and put it in the fridge. (Some folks put on a coat of yellow mustard before the rub to hold the rub on and add to the bark. The mustard taste cooks out. This is a matter of personal preference.)[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Smoking:[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]I canít give instructions for each type of smoker, as I have experience only with mine.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Start your smoker and get it up to 225-240 degrees F. My personal wood choice for pork is hickory. Unwrap the meat, stick in the probe of your digital thermo (A highly recommended accessory.), and place the meat in the smoker, fat side down. I don't flip butts as it interferes with bark formation. Fat side down helps protect the meat if you have a temp spike. After the meat gets over 100F I spray it every hour with a 3 to 1 mix of apple juice and Captain Morganís Original spiced rum. I have used bourbon instead of rum, but my family prefers the taste of the rum spray. The sugars in the juice and booze will caramelize, and add to the bark. (Bark - dark outer crust that develop as the meat cooks.) Others will make good suggestions for alternate sprays. You will develop your own favorite with a little experimentation. (The nice thing is that they all taste good!)[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Foiling:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]When the meat gets to about 165F, double wrap it in Heavy Duty aluminum foil. Put some of your spray of choice in the foil to help braise the meat. At this point I usually stop making smoke unless there are other things in the smoker that need the smoke. (You can finish cooking from this point on in the oven set at 250F if the weather changes or you want to save smoker fuel.) Continue to cook until the internal meat temps gets to 195-205F. Remove the foiled meat from the cooker and wrap it (still foiled) in a couple old bath towels and put it in an insulated cooler to rest for at least an hour before you pull it.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]The Plateau:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Almost all butts (and briskets Ė but thatís in the beef forum) will hit a plateau where the temps of the meat stops rising. Donít be tempted to raise the heat as that will dry out the meat. The meat is absorbing a lot of heat at this point while the connective tissue is breaking down. This is what makes the meat tender. Low and slow is the way to go! Iíve seen some actually drop in temp by a couple degrees. Patience Ė it may be over an hour before the temp starts climbing.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Pulling:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]There are several choices here, some folks use two forks, there is a tool called bear claws, Dutch puts hunks of it in his Mixmaster with the dough blade to pull. I use my hands. I un-foil the meat, the bone usually falls out on itís own, and I break it apart in to big pieces that I let cool for a few minutes. I then go through each piece and pull out the extra gunk (technical term for fat and connective tissue) and shred by hand.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Sauce:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]I serve my pulled pork with my sauce(s) of choice on the side. I will add some of SoFlaQuers finishing sauce (another sticky here in the pork forum) to the pork just after Iíve shredded it. My personal favorite way to eat it is on a cheap white bun (CWB) with a little BBQ slaw right on the pork in the sandwich.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]Time of smoke:[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(24, 24, 24)]The general rule of thumb is that it will take about 1.5 hours of cooking at 225-240F per pound. Keep in mind that this is just a guideline as each piece of meat is different. Go by temp not time to know when it's done. Someone here said, "The meat will be done in it's own good time." I once had two 8 pound butts finish an hour apart in time. Give yourself extra time, you can always keep it wrapped in the cooler a little bit longer before you have to serve. It's hard to rush a piece of meat if it does not want to be rushed.[/COLOR]

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  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Dude, you gotta rock the peameal bacon.

    Step 1: buy peameal bacon.
    Step 2: separate and grill peameal bacon at about 10 minutes a side on medium heat on propane grill (Hank Hill said so). Medium heat = approximately 200 degrees Fahrenheit.
    Step 3: toast buns a minute before peameal bacon is done.
    Step 4: eat peameal bacon until you can feel your arteries start to clog.
    George Dolidze likes this.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member LeenkzMike's Avatar
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    Wish I could give you two or three likes for that one,

    Way to go GM!!!!
    Peace, Mike
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  5. #4
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    WOW - I get homesick for po'boy sandwiches every February, right around Mardi Gras time.

    After erasing that recipe, now all I can think of is how can I afford a smoker, where will I put it on my deck, and will my neighbours get pissed if I won't share...
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  6. #5
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    If you can find a farmer with fresh corn I typically buy around a dozen and take my two huge pots and take rock salt and water. Soak them for 24 hours and slowly smoke them too, this way when I'm done the corn is done and can either be chucked or eaten fresh off the Cobb.


  7. #6
    Senior Member LeenkzMike's Avatar
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    Will someone STOP this thread?? This is cruel and unusual treatment!!!
    Peace, Mike
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    I realllllly need to feel useful, please "like" my signatures!!!! (Button is on the bottom right!)

  8. #7
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    Cole Slaw:
    3/4 cup mayonnaise
    1/4 cup Dijon mustard
    1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
    3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
    2 tablespoons buttermilk
    4 teaspoons celery seeds
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne
    3 cups shredded green cabbage (about 1/2 head cabbage)
    3 cups shredded red cabbage (about 1/2 head cabbage)
    1 green bell pepper, finely diced
    1 large carrot, peeled and shredded
    1/2 cup grated yellow onion
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    In a bowl, combine the mayonnaise, mustard, sugar, vinegar, buttermilk, celery seeds, salt, pepper, and cayenne, and whisk well to dissolve the sugar.

    In a large bowl, combine the remaining ingredients. Toss with the dressing until evenly coated. Adjust seasoning, to taste. Place in the refrigerator, covered, to chill slightly before serving.

    Yield: 8 servings


  9. #8
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    Baked beans:


    Ingredients

    2 cups navy beans
    1/2 pound bacon
    1 onion, finely diced
    3 tablespoons molasses
    2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
    1/2 cup ketchup
    1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    1/4 cup brown sugar

    Directions

    Soak beans overnight in cold water. Simmer the beans in the same water until tender, approximately 1 to 2 hours. Drain and reserve the liquid.
    Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).
    Arrange the beans in a 2 quart bean pot or casserole dish by placing a portion of the beans in the bottom of dish, and layering them with bacon and onion.
    In a saucepan, combine molasses, salt, pepper, dry mustard, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce and brown sugar. Bring the mixture to a boil and pour over beans. Pour in just enough of the reserved bean water to cover the beans. Cover the dish with a lid or aluminum foil.
    Bake for 3 to 4 hours in the preheated oven, until beans are tender. Remove the lid about halfway through cooking, and add more liquid if necessary to prevent the beans from getting too dry.


  10. #9
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    The slaw was taken off the food network. But if someone wants a full re wipe list of rub, mop sauce and sides. Check out:
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/e...ipe/index.html

    I can't tell you my rub and sauce recipes, lol


  11. #10
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    Kitchen Sink Salad

    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Dressing (make it the day before and let it sit in the fridge to meld the flavours)[/COLOR]

    Ĺ cup Purple Basil Vinegar * (to make purple basil vinegar, whirl a cup of purple basil leaves and a cup of white vinegar in a blender until the liquid is pink and the leaves are well chopped up. Strain through a coffee filter. If you can't get purple basil, just use white vinegar and add a teaspoon of dried green basil to the dressing)
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Ĺ cup brown sugar[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]2 TBSP Dill Seed[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]3 TBSP dried oregano[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Stir the above ingredients together in a bowl or jar, and then add:[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]2 Ĺ cups Miracle Whip[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Whisk it all together - if you're using a jar, close the lid tightly and shake until well blended.[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Salad[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Ĺ large green cabbage, cut in approx 1-inch chunks[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Ĺ large red cabbage, cut the same[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]1 large green pepper, cored and diced into 1/2-inch bits[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]1 large red pepper, cored and diced into 1/2-inch bits[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]1 large yellow pepper, cored and diced into 1/2-inch bits[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]1 huge or 2 medium Vidalia onions, diced into 1/2-inch bits[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]3 or 4 stalks celery, sliced on the diagonal into 1/2-inch slices[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]2 large carrots, grate on the large holes of a cheese grater, or sliced thin on the diagonal[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]half a dozen or so radishes, sliced[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]3 red apples, cored and diced into 1/2-inch bits (Delicious, Mac - crisp flesh, rather than mealy)[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]1 cup dark raisins (you can use Sultanas but the dark ones are better)[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]1 to 1Ĺcups roasted salted sunflower seeds[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)](you can add any other vegetables that happen to be in your crisper - but cukes tend to make the salad soggy...)[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Toss it all in a really big bowl. [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Not more than 1 hour before serving, pour the dressing over it and toss again to make sure the dressing is well distributed. [/COLOR]

    [COLOR=rgb(20, 20, 20)]Serves anywhere from 12 to 20.[/COLOR]
    This salad is often specifically requested when we're invited to potlucks or BBQs - and there's never any left over.
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