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Thread: Work office(or work at home) environment, memorizing? Tools? books? Typing skills?

  1. #1
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    Work office(or work at home) environment, memorizing? Tools? books? Typing skills?

    Hi guys,
    I have some newbee questions, I've recently restarted learning to code(JS, HTML4, CSS) for web design. With a goal of getting work, in the next 6 to 12 months, I've got the basics(I believe) of HTML5, and CSS, and getting started on JS, I'm studying(self study, via YouTube, w3 School, and getting some books), about 4-6 hr. almost, every night. I believe, I can get a solid online portfolio up, over the next 6 months,. But, having never worked in an office environment before, I'm lost. I'm hoping I can get some work at home jobs, but if I have to go to an office, I have questions about how to work, so here goes.

    Do you need to memorize all the code you've learned?
    (Seems to me, no one can memorize, every spec of code, but I could be wrong)

    Do you keep books, sites, tool, etc. on hand at your office? Do bosses/manager, allow, require, frown upon such tools?

    What about typing skills, do I have to type a certain number of words, per minute?
    (Seem, I'd have to keep up a certain pace, but since code, can be kind of tricky, maybe, I just need a decent pace?)

    Thanks for any help, Scott

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  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    I work from home, so I'll answer the questions based on the times I've had to work with agencies.

    1) No you don't, because no you can't. ASP.net (C# and VB.net flavours). Classic ASP. PHP. Ruby on Rails. Python. Perl. Erlang. HTML. CSS. Javascript. jQuery. Angular. Node. Any company that would expect you to memorize all of those is insane...and that's if such a company exists.

    2) Sites/tools, absolutely. Not only do I keep them on hand, I let my clients know I use them regularly and I tell them why: "I don't always have the answers on hand, but I damn sure know how to get them when I need them for the most part." They don't care.

    3) I'm going to answer this one a bit differently, using the example of one of my best friends (I'll call him John, but that's not his real name.) John lost the use of his left arm when he was 20 years old in a vehicle accident. It's still technically there, but it doesn't work. It's a dead limb, basically. John learned non-web programming shortly after at a private college...as in a DeVry or Everest-style setup, but without the associated suck. He got a job within a year after graduating, then another, then a third, and he has been at the third job for the last 12 years doing some rather high-tech automation programming.

    Now, as you can imagine, he only types with his right hand, and he would be lucky to reach 40 WPM net. It has never been a factor in terms of employment for him. Obviously it's better if you can type faster, but particularly when you get into higher-end programming where you have to do things such as wait for code to be compiled, run web spiders, run automated setup scripts, batch-style tasks, etc., being a fast typist is almost insignificant. I say that as someone who learned to type properly in high school (I learned to type in Grade 9 in 1991/1992, which was the school year that typewriters were last used in Ontario). As long as you're solving problems and not totally screwing the pooch, you'll be fine.
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    Senior Member Ronald Roe's Avatar
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    Damn. You're my kinda person. 4-6 hours per night. A lot of the people on here could really learn from that. You wouldn't believe how many people come on here like "I work 8 hours/day. I don't have time to learn". It's ridiculous. So, bravo to you. To answer your questions:

    1. The mark of a good developer isn't that they know everything. The mark of a good developer is that they know where to go to find things and how to read and understand specs and developer documentation and apply that to their current situation. No one will ever expect you to memorize the finer points of each language. The one caveat is "familiarity". You should at least be familiar with the finer points, but that's for your own good so you don't spend more time doing research than coding.

    2. I don't currently work in an office, but I have. I would say that most employers are going to be happy as long as they know you know where to go for the information you need. Most are going to know that a lot of that information is on the internet, and books aren't overly necessary. What separates the adults from the children in this industry is whether you "Shotgoogle" for answers or whether you go to the specs and find the real answer.

    3. Nah. I mean, you should probably at least be able to touch type, but beyond that no one cares as long as you meet deadlines.
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    Ron Roe
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    "If every app were designed using the same design template, oh wait...Bootstrap."

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    Thanks guys! Very helpful, and interesting, And inspiring story, about your friend's story, TheGAME1264.

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    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nguyencong1 View Post
    thanks you for share!
    Why do you keep posting this?
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)


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