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  1. #11
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    glakk>> I believe you're arguing different points there. I'm pretty certian all of us would agree (at least I do) that taking a course in Art or Business definatley will make you a better designer. That's the difference there, getting certified is kind of redundant, it's a certificate to prove you know how to use something, wheras an example site prooves you can apply that program to make a great site.

    Learning the basics behind graphical design (remember, this isn't a digital medium, it's been around for decades) will always help you. If you can draw it on paper and it looks great, all you have to do is translate it to the web. If you can't draw it on paper (say even if you have great artistic skills) then you wont be able to make it great on the web, even if you have all the certificates in the world saying you are an expert at Macromedia Dreamweaver & Fireworks, etc, etc.
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
    The blog | The poetry site | The Spore site

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  3. #12
    Senior Member james's Avatar
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    I think there's a lot to be said for having a boss and a 9-5 job as well, and this course, if its GOOD (important to consider), will lead you to that. Employers will know what you've learnt, and can slot you in. Less stress on you because you know where your paycheck is coming from.

    It's up to you. I'd say it's best for most school leavers to have a regimented job, and maybe later you can become a freelancer.

    Is that what you did Transio? You were an Architect before right?

    And don't take my word for it jrocks, I'm just some dude on the internet right.
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  4. #13
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    james, to a point.

    Let me take this in refrence to Civil Engineering (my major)

    If I were to go to UC Davis, get a BS in Civil Engineering, pass my EIT without a days experience, I would have almost no chance of getting a job. The best I could do would be get a low level internship at a firm most likely.

    But why some may ask, when I have a Bachelor's Degree from an accredited Institution? Because firms don't care what your credentials are. Sure, they need to know you have a BS from somewhere, but beyond that, they want to know what you can do. That's one of the biggest reasons I chose Cal Poly, where the motto is Learn By Doing. We do more hands-on labs than any school in CA (for CE I know), and guess what? We have an AMAZING hiring rate for graduating seniors. Something like 60% have a job before graduation, 10% within 1 year of graduation and 20% go on to grad school. Look at the numbers from other instutions and you'll be way suprised to find out it's extremely low. Cal Poly works closely with Engineering Firms and encourages students to get internships the very first year they start, regardless of schooling. What happens is the students graduate with 4 years of internship work, a BS from, quite frankly, one of the best schools in the nation to get an undergraduate degree, and firms take Cal Poly grads as a #1 choice.

    So, while a degree can be helpful, it's still more about experiece and what you can do, not neccecarily the credentials you hold.

    If you are going to learn something in the course, take it by all means. But take it because of the course content, not because of the credentials you'll earn after completing the course. How many people are better drivers after taking traffic school?
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
    The blog | The poetry site | The Spore site

  5. #14
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by james
    It's up to you. I'd say it's best for most school leavers to have a regimented job, and maybe later you can become a freelancer.
    I think this really depends on the individual. I am a "school leaver" (having quit university after a term and a half out of sheer boredom) and I found that the "regimented jobs" were more stressful, even though I had a regular paycheque, because most of the time I was being pushed by other people. I don't particularly care for that, since I'm a self-motivated person. I ended up finding out that as a "gun for hire", I was a lot happier since I could just come in, do my job, and leave without getting sucked into office politics, company policy, and associated BS.

    I'm there for one reason and one reason only; to take care of a fairly immediate client need. Now there's a certain amount of pressure associated with that, but once it's lifted off, that's it. There usually isn't more behind it from that particular client for a few months at least. I'm completely okay with that.

    The other reason I felt I should freelance as much as possible (even sacrificing guaranteed money if necessary) is that it helps the freelancer build both an independent portfolio and his/her own customer base. If I lose a customer as a freelancer and you're half-decent, it may cut into my income 10-15%, and yeah, that will hurt; but if I lose my job, that will cut into my income 100%, and that will really hurt.

    I do have a wide and varied client base, and I've had a lot of exposure to a lot of business philosophies. As a result of that, I've seen some business people who, quite frankly, do not know their *** from a hole in the ground. They're sinking their company, and they're usually the only ones that can't see it. Now, if I were "working" for these people as their webmaster, eventually I'd be out of a job, no question about it. But in the position I'm in, the worst-case scenario is that they go out of business because of mismanagement, I lose a client, and I have to put one of my guys on another project. That's not a nice thing to have to see play itself out, but at least in my position, I can say "okay, that sucked, now let's move on."

    Again though, it's "to each their own".
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