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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    I am considering doing a private course to achieve a Macromedia certified qualification. I was wondering how this compares to other courses, and if it significantly increases job prospects.

    I am 18 and the course i want to take costs 3995. I want to become a web developer and get a job as soon as possible in the web design sector.

    Do you think i should take this course, or are the better options if i look for it.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    Honestly, in the web design business, it's all about what you can do, not about certificates or degrees.

    I'd save that money and time and buy a few books, and spend it learning flash.
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
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  4. #3
    Senior Member glyakk's Avatar
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    It would not be worth it. Those classes are usually only teach you what you need to pass the test. Take that money and spend it like brak said on books, and other training material like videos, webspace, etc.. If you working as a freelancer nobody cares about certifications or education. Ive never been asked by a client what was the highest degree I've attained, or if I was CIW certified, etc.. They just don't care, as long as you can deliver what they want. However, if you are going to be working full time for a company as their webdesigner, usually a degree of some sort is required.

    Although I might reccomend takeing a course at a local community collage over the summer. Usually classes are cheap. It will give you a better oppertunity to network with other students, and instructors.


  5. #4
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    I have never been certified for anything. It hasn't hampered my career in the least.

  6. #5
    Senior Member teal's Avatar
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    Besides, reading those books makes you look really impressive to random passer-bys. Loads of fun giving them strange looks as they stare at the book that has a name they can't comprehend.
    Whoth steps forth to mock the teal? Whom couldst say a color superior!

    Proclamith me, it cannot be done.

  7. #6
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Do what everyone else has told you, jrocks. Pocket your money and teach it to yourself. You'll learn a hundred times more by the DIY method than you will from any courses, and you'll also avoid becoming paralyzed by the chronic predispositions and brainwashing that many "educated" designers and developers (and "educated" people in general) are subject to.

    I also find it rather humourous when someone sends me their resume and lists off all of their educational requirements, then they show me their portfolio and it's three sites done in Front Page. That never fails to crack me up.

    Like transio, I've never had any formal training in design and development. I just picked it up online as I went along. I've never even spent a red cent on a book about any of it. I just went and did it. Not only that, when I bring people on, I find it's easier to work with the ones who aren't formally trained than the ones that are, since they're always asking me things like, "well, what did the customer give you for an RFP outline?" Anyone who deals in any level of business knows that 95% of business decision makers neither know nor care what an RFP is.

    It's hard to explain exactly what I mean without giving away more than I want to, jrocks, but the gist of it is...just learn it, and do it.
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  8. #7
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264
    Not only that, when I bring people on, I find it's easier to work with the ones who aren't formally trained than the ones that are, since they're always asking me things like, "well, what did the customer give you for an RFP outline?" Anyone who deals in any level of business knows that 95% of business decision makers neither know nor care what an RFP is.
    LOL! Had a class that covered RFP 2 months ago, it's just common sense crap.
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  9. #8
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    I studied some programming back in the day (about 10 years ago), but never "web design".

    Skills are pointless to study formally.

    Concepts are invaluable.

    Go take an art class, or something that teaches you about colors, layout, and conceptual design.

    Or buy a book on marketing, advertising, or sales.

    Skills are transient.

  10. #9
    Senior Member glyakk's Avatar
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    Guess I stand alone, I had formal training. In fact my major was multimedia/web design. Although like ive said befor, the education I recieved there did not prepare me for the industry. The industry is too new, changes too much and is just too big to be covered adiquitly. The in's and out's I had to learn on my own. However being one of the Art Instute schools I did learn a great deal about color, form, layout, information design, etc.. And that has been very valuable to me.


  11. #10
    Senior Member DesignBox's Avatar
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    Same with me too. I'm studying Multimedia and also working as a web designer. My degree will not help me in my career, but it may help in big companies. As glyakk said, I also have learnt alot of stuff about colour, layouts, how to think differntly etc, but I just think college has given me the basics to go further on my own. Most of the stuff I have learnt are at work, either by myself or watching colleagues.

    And thats how you learn really. Through work experience. The real world is the best teacher


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