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  1. #1
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    http://www.theinquirer.net//?article=16126

    Is it just me, or is this a major copout on Comcast's part?
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  3. #2
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    The story seems to cut short... I'll look at it later somewhere elsxe, however the funniest part of that was the "Flame the Editor" link at the bottom... HAHAHAH
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  4. #3
    Senior Member glyakk's Avatar
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    I have no idea if this story holds up.. but after reading it, I found it ironic that comcast has a FAQ on stopping spammers!!


  5. #4
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    It's good to see they're so conscientious about their efforts. I'm impressed. Where's their lifetime subscription form?

    * shakes his head *

    You know, all they have to do is not allow port forwarding on 25, then track the outbound stuff, and they'll be able to isolate and fix the problem. If they really wanted to solve it, Secure Authentication would help too.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

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  6. #5
    Senior Member splufdaddy's Avatar
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    I recently read something about this regarding their policy of suspending service to a customer. A "zombie computer" by their definition is a PC that has been hacked into by a spammer and is used to send out spam, unknown to the PC owner. When Comcast finds a zombie computer, they first notify the subscriber that their PC's security has been compromised. If they don't fix it themselves, then they suspend the user's account until the problem is fixed. Seems like they need to devise a stronger plan. Shutting off all zombie computers immediately and developing a manual+software kit to help disinfect most computers is one suggestion. Most users don't know how to clean their system (hence why their computer is a zombie in the first place). Shutting them off will motivate them to fix the problem, and they can't get too upset if they are handed the solution.

  7. #6
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    Spluf, yes, a first-aid kit would be nice, however, is it really their responsibility? No. I to tech support for an ISP, and usually turning off someone's connection is the only way to get them to actually listen! For instance, for the past week we've been getting this one moron (and that's a compliment to this guy) call up and he has some web browser hijack sofware on his system, as well as a lot of spyware. He's got an internet connection, but his PC is riddled with junk that prevents him from doing anything online. He's called up like 10 times this week, and frankly, he's too stupid to realize what's happening. He FINALLY took his PC to a tech like we've been telling him to do, and all they did was to slap SpyBot on it. Not gonna fix it!

    Long story short, these rules set up by ISPs are for the overall good. Most people that get suspended get their PCs fixed, place better security on their PC, and are more careful. Occasionally, they get suspended multiple times because of their ineptitude. Either way, it's not the ISP's problem.
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  8. #7
    Senior Member splufdaddy's Avatar
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    I totally agree with you, it's not the ISP's problem. However, it seems like they're scared to turn off a user's connection, hence the warning and "grace period". I'm not sure how long Comcast gives customers after they've been warned before turning their connection off, but it's too long. If Comcast finds a zombie on their network, they should shut them down immediately. This delay, probably of a few days gives spammers too much time.

    However: Comcast has lots of customers paying $50+ a month for an internet connection that they know little to nothing about. To ease the sting of having their connection shut off, and to save their tech's from having to deal with the thousands of angry customers that can't fix their internet connection, it may be in Comcast's best interest to develop a general solution disc. Once produced, it can be sent out in bulk for a fraction of what it would cost for all the tech support calls.

    All I'm saying is that Comcast needs to tighten their security policies, and offering some help in bulk (through their website or discs) would make them seem a little friendlier.

  9. #8
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    They're not scared, they just like paying customers If it's an obvious zombie, yeah, they'll get shut down quickly. Spyware calls are quick. "Oh, you've got spyware? Talk to a PC tech, not our problem."
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  10. #9
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Actually, I would disagree that it's not the ISP's problem. In order for a computer to become infected, something has to be executed on that computer.

    Usually the program that causes the infection comes from an email, or from a web site, or from a chat program, or some form of Internet-based activity. That same activity has to pass through the ISP. Most ISPs monitor and log traffic (as they should). AOL, for example, monitors and logs it as part of the whole Parental Control deal. So it is possible for the ISP to determine the type of traffic that is passing through their servers.

    Why is this important? Because if the ISP can determine the traffic, the ISP can set up things to help block the offending traffic. Things like AV gateway servers, for example, can and should be implemented to block virus-related emails, at no extra charge to the customer since it helps curtail problems on the network (hey Bell Canada? Did you get that? It says you shouldn't be selling something that is of equal benefit to you and your customers. Oh wait, I'm talking to a brick wall. Never mind.)

    The cavalier attitude that Comcast is taking is, unfortunately, rather typical of ISPs in general. They're the root cause of the problem and will refuse to deal with it.

    This doesn't even take into account the 100,000,000 spam emails that go through Comcast's system that aren't from zombie machines. What about those? I can understand there being a large number of spam emails going through the servers of a company as large as Comcast's, but that many? That's just too much. If they're worried about losing a customer who spams by pointing it out, they should be more worried about losing the 100 they'll lose as a result of server downtimes and connectivity issues.

    The attitude taken by Comcast and other ISPs toward the issue of spam, UCE, and virii absolutely sucks right now. There's no better way to put it. It sucks. And it is just as much their problem as it is anyone else's.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)


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