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  1. #1
    Senior Member young_fighter33's Avatar
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    how much do charge a client for a site?


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  3. #2
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    Search the forums. Short answer: depends on what they can pay versus quality of site, features, etc.

    There is NO guideline for this kind of thing. too many variables.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member young_fighter33's Avatar
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    but really what I am asking is, like do someone get paid for a period of time and get paid on a weekly/monthly bases or its a commitment that you have to do the site and just pay you one time and its done and over w. and you have to do the site until the client says otherwise?


  5. #4
    Senior Member seanmiller's Avatar
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    The price you charge for a site depends on various things.

    - How complex is the site going to be?
    - What are you giving them that others don't? Are you selling quality of code? Cross-browser guarantees? Search engine rankings maybe?
    - What support are you providing? Is there any free aftercare provided? Support or, perhaps, a maximum of nn small changes during the first twelve months included in the initial price?
    - Does the site come with hosting? And/or a domain?

    When you put all these together then you need to work out the price.

    You can do the price on the basis of either
    - per hour
    - fixed price for the whole project

    I would consider that most businesses would prefer a fixed price. Per hour is great but how do they know how many hours you've spent? That said your quote still has to based on how long you think it will take you; anything other than that would be suicide... so work out what you think you are worth per hour, calculate how long you think it's going to take you and then look at the resulting total. If it sounds reasonable and you reckon that they'll go with it then offer that total as a quote.

    Do, however, make quite clear what the quote is for. Tell them what you'll provide for that price in detail and explain that if the requirements change then additional cost may be incurred. Reassure them, however, that if any additional cost is likely to be incurred you will tell them *before* you embark on the extra work so that they have the option of saying "ok then, leave it as it was". This aspect is very important because a customer may whilst you're producing their site see somebody else's and think "hang on - I really want that too" and before you know it you're doing 3 weeks work for the price of 2 days.

    I would recommend prototyping the site and showing it to the customer before you get heavily involved in the coding. Make sure they're happy with what you are going to do before you do it, rather than ending up in an expensive re-work later. If your idea of what they want is not their idea of what they want and you rush headlong into that there is only going to be one person paying in the end - you ! They will claim you did not deliver what you promised and you will have nowhere to go. Prototype, print off screenshots and get them to sign them. Then you're covered.

    Returning to a previous point I personally think providing the hosting and the domain with a site is a good idea... many businesses like a "one stop shop"... they'll know you designed the site, they'll know that you support the site and they'll know that you will renew their domain, hosting etc. each year and will bill them. And because you are their sole point of contact regarding the site your chances of getting the business to re-work the site further down the line are greatly enhanced.

    Hope that some of that made sense :-)

    Sean

  6. #5
    Senior Member tha_Gsheep's Avatar
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    The problem is that the whole area of pricing in Web design is regarded as a secret to be kept between individual agencies. This really hampers standards because everyone is going about unchecked and the people losing out are the clients who keep getting duped and don't know any better. If that wasn't bad enough as web designers we've been stopped from talking about it on the web because of fears of the very opposite, price fixing! Its all pretty stupid and I'd say to you just use common sense and charge a fair price and the truth will give you credibility you could never fake.

    What SeanMiller said is very true and to that I will add the benefit of a thousand worried desingers and their articles at sitepoint.com/ forums since there are a lot of professionals there and if you can find it a great thread with loads of great links(I couldn't find it). The best bit of advice I can give you is do not charge much and work very hard. If you do this for a long time eventually you will have lots of small increments that have built into enough to sustain you and you will be well on your way. Good luck!
    www.appletv.co.uk


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