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  1. #1
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    that is one of the national hubs of the web industry, (e-commerce, web 2.0, web production, e.t.c.) and relocate to a city or town that doesn't have a prosperous web industry? How difficult was for you to work long-distance for a production company based in NY, LA, SF, or other metropolises after your relocation? What are some tips for making it a successful experience? Thanks!

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Arkette's Avatar
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    Although I live in Europe most of the year, I have a friend who lives and works in N.Y. She is a page designer, and works from home almost exclusively, keeping in touch with her clients via email and phone. She and her husband also have a house in France that they would both like to live in all year round. Her husband is a freelance jounalist and so it would make no diference to him whatsoever. The thing that is stopping them is her clients. Although she only visits them in person maybe once or twice a year, they are absolutely dead set against her moving away - not even as far as New England, which is where she was born. And so possibly the stumbling block for you, will not be the remoteness of your location, so much as your clients attitude to it.
    End of Line.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Shani's Avatar
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    I recently moved from DC to Atlanta, which isn't exactly the same thing as you're describing, and especially considering I wasn't actually working full time in web design in DC, but...

    - A friend of mine recently moved from DC to Milwaukee, he's now telecommuting.
    - Every city has a need for designers and developers, it just may be in a different capacity. As in, some HUGE firms have web departments, whereas in smaller cities they have a "web guy" who does a little bit of everything.

    Questions to you: are you moving? have you moved? or are you just planning to move? Where to?
    Shani

    I have an eye for detail like you'd never believe.

  5. #4
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    Well DCScene, I am planning to move to Houston, Texas but I also have the option to stay in the Bay Area and suffer paying rent while finding a good, part-time job and finishing school.

    However, the Bay Area has been one of the national hubs for the internet industry, which is good and bad. Bad because of the huge competition here for jobs. Good, because there has been a steady, constant demand for web developers, (from your Flash artist to your Ruby guru) whereas in Houston there is a need for web designers but not much of a community for people interested in this non-traditional field.

    So if I do go to Houston, I am afraid that I will lose touch with the web industry/community here in the SF Bay Area. Some examples of the vibrancy of the Bay Area web community are non-profit organizations like BAVC.org, social meeting sites like Tribe.net that are heavily attended by people from the Bay Area, and the mayor of SF has even proposed to have a citywide wireless network. I can't imagine that in Houston. New York? Easily..but I don't have the money or connections to live there comfortably.

    Once I finish college I want to have a career that has something to do with marketing and multimedia, which is why until I graduate I'm hoping to obtain a part-time job in Houston that involves web design, instead of working at Office Depot as a stockperson or being an admin assistant at an oil company. I don't want to lose focus again, because I've just spent 3 years in electrical construction due to the dot-com bust. I made good money, but I hated my work. I tried to build websites on the side but it's hard being a solo web freelancer if you already have a 40 hour job + night classes.

    The best scenario for Houston is that I get my degree at U of H, maintain a paid internship or entry-level job at a design studio, and then (if I have money saved up) move on to another city OR move back to SF if I've successfully worked for a Bay Area company via long distance.

  6. #5
    Senior Member glyakk's Avatar
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    There are plenty of oppertunities here in Houston. Having lived here all my life I can personally vouch for that!! It's nothing what you are probably used to, but we are far from an technology-inept wasteland. The good news is you wont have nearly as much compitition but demand is still huge.

    Houston is a work city, very industrious, and one of the best places to start a company if that is your ultimate intent. Business is huge here and you will learn that quickly if you have the nose for it. Even if you are not looking to start a company yourself, you will still benifit from the amount of people who are in need of your valuable services for their own companies.

    Note: you do not have to live in or be surrounded by the same community you are used to in the bay area to achieve all of your goals. Of course not having expierianced what you go though I imagine that since everybody around you is trying to do what you do, there is alot of exchanging of ideas but not alot of action. Here its all about putting what you know into action, and getting paid for it.

    Frankly, I think your best case senario for Houston is pretty bleak, and not really based on fact. If you go into it expecint mediocre results that is what you will get. If you go into it with a positive attitude and do with what you got I think you will be greatly suprised by what you can find here.


  7. #6
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    And let's not forget that, while you may lose some of the social networking in physical terms, you don't have to lose touch with trends in the webdev world in general, since the Internet is the biggest hub for that.


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