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  1. #1
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    will there still be a high demand for HTML/CSS/Javascript designers and Flash interactive designers?

    I got this job description from a typical Web 2.0 company. I feel that I should invest some time in learning AJAX and new Web 2.0 technologies but I admit I am way underqualified for this job position. Is the national web industry leading to a higher demand for programming skills? If so, then what particular web languages should we learn to prepare ourselves years from now?

    Web Application Developer
    Position Description:
    This is a full time Java server-side developer/architect, reporting to the Vice President of Product Development. The ideal candidate will possess the ability to develop highly scalable, reliable software independently and take direction in a team-based environment. This position requires a versatile player with excellent design and software development skills, technical savvy, great attention to detail, and proven expertise in java server technologies. A demonstrated portfolio of recent work is essential. This position includes high-level design as well as hands-on development and testing.

    Qualifications
    Expert Server-side Java skills: Java, Servlets, HTML, XML, Tomcat
    Experience with XML databases preferred, especially Oracle Sleepycat DBXML, XQuery, XSLT1.0/2.0
    J2EE Application Server and transaction management (e.g. JTA)
    Deep understanding of dynamic Web application architecture and deployment
    Experience building highly scalable server applications
    Experience with session management, XML web services
    Experience with PHP, Python and/or Javascript preferred.
    Prior experience with database design and SQL
    Strong OO design skills
    7+ years development experience
    BA/BS in Computer Science or equivalent

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  3. #2
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    You'll find that any truly scalable enterprise-grade web site will be written in JSP or ASP.NET. PHP is only popular because it's free, relatively easy to use, and installed on almost every Linux-based server.

    You will definitely want to learn Ajax, not just because of the cool stuff you can do with it, but because it's becoming more and more common in such sites.

    (not innuendo for WDF v6)
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  4. #3
    Senior Member solidgold's Avatar
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    according to .net magazine we should be learning AJAX 'by 2007, or you run the risk of becoming a relic' and they seem to be in the know

  5. #4
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    Whats the difference between Ajax and javascript? People keep telling me that JavaScript is used in Ajax... So is Ajax a combination of languages or its own unique language?

  6. #5
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    The Rules
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by filburt1
    You'll find that any truly scalable enterprise-grade web site will be written in JSP or ASP.NET. PHP is only popular because it's free, relatively easy to use, and installed on almost every Linux-based server.
    Yeah, only stupid little companies like Yahoo, Amazon, and Google use things other than .NET/J2EE

    Seriously though... AJAX to me is a natural evolution of designer. If you get good at HTML, it'll get boring and you need something else to spend time on. AJAX is perfect.

    BTW, that job description is totally bogus.
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
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  8. #7
    Junior Member caterpixel's Avatar
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    I sure hope that job description is bogus...it's asking for quite a lot of skills.

    I'm working on increasing my knowledge of CSS to the point where I know it forward and backward (like I know XHTML). After that, I'd like to learn AJAX. I'm fine with implementing other people's code and doing minor hacks, but as far as writing my own code from scratch, that's still beyond me!

  9. #8
    Member amessinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brak
    BTW, that job description is totally bogus.
    I don't know about bogus, but it definitely looks like the product of a human resources bureaucracy rather than a description written by someone who actually knows what the position involves. HR departments (and sometimes, clueless IT managers) love to stuff job ads with every hot buzzword they can come up with. Unfortunately, some companies will then computer-screen the resumes of applicants and reject those that aren't buzzword-compliant.

    That said, the position in question does seem to be fairly high-up in the company food chain. My guess is that they're looking for someone who's been around the block several times by now, has worked on projects using diverse technologies and languages, and has a bit of management experience to boot. It'd be damned nice if they'd actually say so, but you usually have to read between the lines on these things.

    If you decide to apply, best of luck. Just keep in mind that your resume is likely to be "read" by a computer before it ever reaches human eyes.
    Zenscope Studio
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