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  1. #1
    Junior Member qqibb's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    As a freelance web designer, graphic designer (Asian). The ways to get jobs and payment only the following two, I think. Really?
    1. Build my own website to show my works and attract employers to contact me
    2. Join in top freelance websites to bid on projects.
    Is it practicable for me?
    Anyone would like to introduct your own experience and suggest me? Thanks.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Steax's Avatar
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    I'm a 16-year old who freelances as a web programmer. My artistic sense is kinda slow, but I guess it's OK. I'm actually not that great a designer, but yeah, having friends is great. They give me great ideas and sometimes their wacky ideas become awesome results.

    I personally gather my, well, money from friends, family, and organizations. Excuse my lack of modesty, but here in Indonesia, web designers who don't make web pages purely in frontpage or dreamweaver could be hand-counted. Luckily I'm one of them... (I do use dreamweaver's script editing functions, easy, but that's not pure. I PHP.) This sets me apart. People tend to recognize my work by seeing my simplicity and effectivity, not flashy and decorative elements. This has been a reason (aside from my growing ability to write extensive PHP applications and my own CMS) that companies further and further away from me have lately been employing me.

    As a student, I don't get much time or trust for projects, so I often point people at my other pieces of work. I often get into trouble because I like to emphasize on accessibility & usability (believe it or not, some people don't want to put 10 lines of extra JS for support for those who disable it, in a country where half of use use IE5.x) and end up criticizing government/large company websites. Thats usually where I get a name for myself, when the company accuses me of some weird law, but people agree with my views.

    So I usually earn my clients, not look for them. They look for me. Try making your own, simple and effective trademark. See how fast you'll boom. (I've made websites for 16 organizations.)
    Note on code: If I give code, please note that it is simply sample code to demonstrate an effect. It is not meant to be used as-is; that is the programmer's job. I am not responsible to give you support or be held liable for anything that happens when using my code.

  4. #3
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    There are a lot of site designers out there. You'll have to start small, even for free,
    to build a portfolio of sites. I would say that the biggest thing is supporting the
    client during and after the site build. Once you have a client, you quickly handle any
    problems that arise and make any required changes quickly. If you exceed their
    expectations, they will pass on your name to others.


  5. #4
    Senior Member
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    Just be very very good with your clients, they will then pass your name around. Furthermore if you get a long with your client they will pay you for redesigns and may even keep you on to update the site.

    Just undercut the web design market till you possess the reputation and skills to get jobs by yourself

  6. #5
    Senior Member solidgold's Avatar
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    I'm a 16-year old who freelances as a web programmer
    me too!
    i started out by doing websites for local companies; electricians and things like that for really minimum prices then worked up a reputation about the town.
    you have to make sure youre capable of supplying your client with anything they want on their website: flash games, php items of all sorts, databases etc. that way you can offer them the best possible service for their money, also take their imput seriously, if they ask for something specific ensure that it is included up to the standard they need.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Ferro's Avatar
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    Do you think that formal qualifications help? How about those certificates that WC3 schools offer?
    I'm also interested in this too. Nowhere near good enough yet, but working towards it anyway...... I'm 35 however, not 16

  8. #7
    Senior Member solidgold's Avatar
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    its never too late to get into this sort of thing!
    formal qualifications look good to potential clients/employers and its always good to get taught officially, that way you learn the best way to do things.
    i dont know about w3c schools certificates to be honest

  9. #8
    Senior Member aubreyisland's Avatar
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    I'm in the same boat as you. I've been doing web design forever, but did work doing graphic design the last couple of years, therefore I'm currently building a web portfolio. I decided only recently that web design is what I really want to do. I've got a couple sites to finish and I might be able to start my own freelancing company. But, for now, I mingle and gain clients through the trust of friends or people I did graphic design for, and they trust I can do web design also. Once I get 8 or 9 sites / jobs (I set a goal) my portfolio will go up online. So I just keep a blog for now, so I can at least build some credibility.

    So, I liked what Perad said, be good with people and they will trust you. Smile, honestly, laugh freely, and look them straight in the eye when you shake their hands; deliver! Portfolio's come second only to that.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Steax's Avatar
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    Yeah, be friendly, that's the key. If you're good, meet their expectations, and understand what they want, they'll remember you.

    And its helpful if you forsee possible problems in their websites. Like if you notice that the bandwidth is getting tight, recommend them to upgrade, modify their gallery to fit them better, etc. Often clients just set you simple requests, but if you can expand and care for their sites, they'll make great note of you.
    Note on code: If I give code, please note that it is simply sample code to demonstrate an effect. It is not meant to be used as-is; that is the programmer's job. I am not responsible to give you support or be held liable for anything that happens when using my code.


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