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Thread: Career Switch

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    I am from management background but want to switch to web designing. I have learnt HTML, CSS and javascript but I want to get necessary skills to make really good websites which require knowhow of lot of technologies. Someone told me it is good to design websites with the help of Visual Studio to make your sites look professional and if you are seriouslly into webdesigning you should get MCAD. I need your advice is this true and what should I learn to make professional websites.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member solidgold's Avatar
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    programs are all well and good, but cant really replace CSS and (x)HTML, as so often is the case, simple is best.
    just look at what current professional website designers are doing and try to emulate this, this is probably the best way to learn what goes and what doesnt.

  4. #3
    Senior Member
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    MCAD? Visual Studio? Eh?

    Visual Studio would only be used if you wanted to make ASP.NET sites -- which is not entirely impossible. There are, however, other server-side technologies, such as PHP, regular ASP, Ruby on Rails, Perl, and others.

    At the end of the day, I have yet to run into a project that can't be coded with ease in a simple text editor (granted, by `simple' I mean ViM, which isn't quite simplicity defined). I've also only used MS languages sparsely (ASP VBScript, specifically), so your mileage may vary.

    Regardless, learn XHTML, CSS, and at least dabble in Javascript. These will be the bread and butter of all your designs. Then (or in parallel), learn a server-side language like PHP, ASP.NET, Rails, or somesuch, or several of them (as I've taken to doing). These will be the bread and butter of all your development.

  5. #4
    Senior Member -chris-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowfiend
    These will be the bread and bugger of all your development.
    Never heard that phrase before!
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    Was my post, or someone elses, helpful? Click the thumbs up to let everyone know!

  6. #5
    Senior Member
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    *facepalm*. Fixed.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
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    Practice practice practice. The potential earnings in this solely dependant on what you can produce.

    If you are in the lower end of web design you will be scrapping for every job and dealing with difficult clients more often.

    If you have a strong portfolio and tidy code you will be able to take on projects for medium to large businesses. This is where the money and good clients are.


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