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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    10945
    I want to continue my education and get a degree. It's not too late to apply for a scholarship to help pay for classes even though it would be easier to get a loan. (and then worry, worry about paying it off later)

    But even if I prevent from using my savings for education, there is still the matter of work. Right now I work a 30 hour part-time retail job and I hate it because it's physically demanding and it's far away from admin and web design, which I am experienced in. I need a better job, but there aren't any legitimate part-time admin/web jobs in the city I'm located in. However there are some full-time gigs and so I'd like to know:

    If you've work full-time, on-site at a web design company for a couple of months in good standing, will they give you the opportunity to decrease your hours for school purposes?

    It seems like a long shot. I can't get into freelancing, because I need a paycheck every week for food and other necessities.

    Thanks

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  3. #2
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    Most companies will let you take a somewhat smaller workweek if you still work a useful number of hours to them and you still clearly intend to work for them (i.e., you're there for a likely long-term position). However, two months might not be enough time to prove to them that you're worthy of it; you would need more time, I suspect, to convince them that they should keep you on at less hours versus hiring a new person full-time.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  4. #3
    Senior Member planetgman's Avatar
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    Jun 2005
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    The other thing to look at is what your degree will be in. Is it going to benefit the company in anyway? Meaning in web design?
    Plus, what is your commitment to the company after you get your degree? Most people that earn a degree go out and shop that around in the market.
    Afterall, you probably will be worth more after your degree. Is the current company going to pay you for that?

    How loyal can you be to a company after 60 days? And......how loyal should they be to you?
    I agree that it is too short a period of time to really prove anything to them. After all, it is only 40 days of work.

    As a business owner, I would be concerned if I hired someone who wanted to go back to school and ask for me to cut their hours after a couple of months.
    This is something that should be brought up in the interview process. Let the owner know and evaluate the situation and let him figure out if that is a road he wants to pursue.
    GMan

  5. #4
    Senior Member beachkitty85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Apex, NC
    Posts
    131
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    14894
    I agree that this is something you should run by your potential employer in the intial interview. She might get quite concerned if you suddenly decide to cut back and go to school. Plus, lots of companies don't even offer part time hours. This is something you need to consder.
    Christina Van Dyke

    CRV Designs
    Apex, NC
    www.crv-designs.com


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