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  1. #1
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    Someone in my family just brought this up......if I don't answer it, I might lose family members (they have never liked the idea of me doing a startup, but being the stubborn idiot I am I'm sticking with it), so I highly appreciate any insightful response.
    I don't really have a background in web design, so how can I ensure any code
    that whoever outsource firm gives me isn't copied off somewhere else, and then I get sued for it?
    They insist I go learn some web design before hand....in the past, I've tried but really, I personally know I will probably never be an excellent designer....as I hate to be to honest ( I love marketing though)

    I realize you should stick to what you are good at and I hate web design and computer programming, but I can't seem to convince my family that this is the correct thing to do.

    Also, what could you do if your technical partner leaves you....what could you do
    if you don't have a strong web design background so that all hell does not totally break lose?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Steax's Avatar
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    What code are we talking about here? Code like HTML, CSS, and JS are obviously copied everywhere and are simply beyond boundaries - they're reused everywhere. Now, server-side applications are a different matter. They are generally either free or custom made. You don't really need to worry, as nobody sees this stuff anyway - they only see the end result, and its simple to make something that replicates the result of other software. Generally this stuff isn't much of a worry.

    Now, answer this question: What are you trying to be?
    Note on code: If I give code, please note that it is simply sample code to demonstrate an effect. It is not meant to be used as-is; that is the programmer's job. I am not responsible to give you support or be held liable for anything that happens when using my code.

  4. #3
    Senior Member mossoi's Avatar
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    I hate web design and computer programming
    I would seriously consider not entering a market that you admit to hating. There are enough people around who have a passion for this type of work and it will show in how they deal with clients compared to you.

    Web design isn't what it was 10 years ago and if you think there's easy money to be made I would think carefully, clients are becoming more knowledgeable. On paper it might look like a good idea to sell something, anything that you think can make you money. In reality you have to have a passion to be successful. Ask any successful entrepreneur.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Eddy Bones's Avatar
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    Also, what could you do if your technical partner leaves you....what could you do
    if you don't have a strong web design background so that all hell does not totally break lose?
    Find a marketing job in another industry. Besides, you can't market what you don't like. Don't waste your time.

  6. #5
    Senior Member seanmiller's Avatar
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    I am reading between the lines here... please correct me if I am wrong...

    a. You set up a startup company with a technical friend, who then decided to jump ship and left you with a load of outstanding orders or promises
    b. You don't want to let people down or lose face, and figure that it'd be better to find a way to rebuild the business without your previous business partner
    c. To do this you're considering outsourcing the work to others, but want to be sure that they're not infringing any copyrights or selling you other folks' work.

    I think the answer to this is very simple, it's refining the contract that you sign with the people you outsource the work to. You make sure the wording makes them completely liable should any copyright infringement take place and you have to take a site down and that they are required to compensate you for any losses sustained as a result.

    Apart from that there is little you can do, apart from choosing wisely who you outsource the work to and occasionally Googling or asking around if there's something you suspect "isn't quite right". Find people with a proven track record, who've been working for several years and have a portfolio of satisfied customers that are actually contactable. It's all very well saying "2,000 satisfied customers in the last year" but if they're not willing to site several as references it means nothing.

    Ultimately you would have had no control over copyright infringement if you didn't know about it if your former business partner had harvested private material from the web, and you'd have been in just the same situation. The key is to have it covered with insurance and contractual law and you should be fine.

    Sean

  7. #6
    Senior Member seanmiller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddy Bones
    Find a marketing job in another industry. Besides, you can't market what you don't like. Don't waste your time.
    I think you've got this person wrong... they want to get people on the web, they have a passion for marketing the web, but they don't have a desire to get involved in the design or programming themselves.

    That is fair enough.

    Hopefully in a month or two another programming partner, or two or three, will come along and the business will grow. With a person who can market the concepts, and some talented technical and design resource to hand, there is no reason why he should not be able to succeed.

    Many very talented designers and programmers would rather not deal with customers directly, and there is a market there.

    Fair play.

    Only Matcire knows if he's made the right decision - could be the best decision he made in his life, or the worst. But all we can do is help ensure the latter doesn't manifest.

    :-)

    Sean

  8. #7
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matcire
    I highly appreciate any insightful response.
    I don't really have a background in web design, so how can I ensure any code
    that whoever outsource firm gives me isn't copied off somewhere else, and then I get sued for it?
    Ignoring the rest of the thread, I'd like to address this issue.

    Create a formal agreement with the firm you contract to develop your project that outlines their responsibilities in detail:

    1. That they will provide professional quality workwith your direction and within the defined scope of the project.

    2. That you will own the final product.

    3. That they will use code that either a) they create, b) is licensed under GNU, or c) is licensed to you by the 3rd-party developer.

    4. That they document everything that they didn't develop, so you know what's in your website.

    5. That they document everything they DID develop, so future coders know what to look for.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Eddy Bones's Avatar
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    Touche. And I may not have all the experience here to speak from, but here's my question (that matcire could answer, or anyone else who knows): If you're a startup company, one person doing development and one person doing marketing, how are you going to finish these projects fast enough (even with outsourcing) to pay a decent wage to both people (and the company you're outsourcing to)? I don't know all the circumstances, but that right there would be a reason for me to back out if I was a developer. It's not a promising situation.

    But then I don't know the details, and again, experience isn't in my favor. But things don't add up positively in my view.

  10. #9
    Senior Member seanmiller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddy Bones
    Touche. And I may not have all the experience here to speak from, but here's my question (that matcire could answer, or anyone else who knows): If you're a startup company, one person doing development and one person doing marketing, how are you going to finish these projects fast enough (even with outsourcing) to pay a decent wage to both people (and the company you're outsourcing to)? I don't know all the circumstances, but that right there would be a reason for me to back out if I was a developer. It's not a promising situation.

    But then I don't know the details, and again, experience isn't in my favor. But things don't add up positively in my view.
    It can work if you can devise products that can then be re-sold in addition to bespoke requirements, which is what keeps the developer busy.

    Sean


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