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Thread: ty

  1. #1
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    Thanks for the help

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    Senior Member Dorky's Avatar
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    I work as a cook. a lot of my coworkers have masters, and yet still they serve drinks, tend bar, and some even share the kitchen with me. what this tells me.......
    is that its not just about the education. it about the determination to carve out your own in this world.

    while($get_it !== true){ continue; }

  4. #3
    Senior Member aeroweb99's Avatar
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    Scott, there really are not a lot of people that can do both really well! I think a lot of it has to do with the 2 sides of the brain, the creative side and technical side come from one side each. A somewhat small percentage are able to excel at both.

    I'm kinda the opposite of you- I find myself getting better and better at the front end, but lacking a lot of coding skills as far as php and databases and things like that. However, I actually believe I can do both well eventually. I just don't have the time to put into schooling myself or take classes because my life is already total chaos!

    I thought about hiring a backend coder as I have had to turn down a couple of big jobs just because I don't know how to do all that, which really sucks! If I want my biz to make the next level up, then I either need to learn it or hire someone to work that end for me. Maybe you could do the same, hire some with a good creative talent.

    Then there's the written content which is the 3rd side of the brain!

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    aburningflame,

    I feel your pain. From the little experience I have, Dreamweaver by itself doesn't inspire much. Sure, it's cool for layouts. But the really cool stuff lies in knowing how to use Flash and Photoshop in conjunction with Dreamweaver, IMHO. Creating your own buttons, menus, and images really brings out the creativity. Here's my company's site (please don't judge me on this alone. was my first website,... EVER):

    http://www.shelby-sheriff.org/

    I used to wonder how other sites looked so cool. Now I know. But I was thrown into the fire and was told to figure out everything with minimal assistance from my "co-workers". I've since become jaded and it's only been a few months. Trying to keep what little passion I have left for doing this.

    To add to what the poster above me stated, that technical side has to deal with the learning curve, so it seems. It can really get in the way of the creative process.

  6. #5
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    ya i know the feeling.
    the sherrif site actually looks well put together.

    http://www.scottmoniz.com

    This would be my very first site, and as you can tell, it sucks im actually in the process of redesigning

    ive attached a sample screenshot, lemme know what you think
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #6
    Senior Member Orlando Web Des's Avatar
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    Scott..

    Everything takes time. If I showed you my first website from 1998, you would laugh.

    Just keep on keeping on my friend. It will come

    Read tutorials on the web, learn learn learn

    Front end design can be learned over time

  8. #7
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    We've discussed this paradox before ....

    "When you design a website, you NEVER like the way it looks!"

    I can't explain it, but you just never like the way your own web sites look.
    I'm not sure if it has to do with working on it so many hours, or you get
    tired of it, or whatever. You'll never be satisfied with it.

    That's why you need opinions from other "strangers". People you don't know.
    To put your head back into reality.


  9. #8
    Member JasonMc's Avatar
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    I come from the other side, I'm more creative than programmer. Although I'd love to do some cool programmer stuff, I just can't get around it! Best thing to do is stick to what you are good at and collaborate with creatives. If I get stuck with programming I get someone else to do it. Like another poster said, there are very few people who are extremely skillful at both!

  10. #9
    Junior Member Chris_G's Avatar
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    @aburningflame

    It sounds like you should stick to programming. That's fine. There is plenty of work for programmers, and most larger firms have greater divisions of labor -- You're forced into one bucket or the other whether by your choice or not.

    Stick with programming, it sounds like you're good, and as important, confident of yourself as a programmer. The fact that you seem to appreciate design, though you don't consider yourself good at it, will probably make you a programmer that good designers like to work with.

    I'm strictly on the design side of the fence. I understand the technologies, but I'm crap at code, and made a conscious decision early in my career to focus on creative and leave the programming to others.

    Best of luck in your endeavors.
    My name is Chris Grayson. You can visit my website at: Art Director Or read my blog at: GigantiCo
    As an Art Director and Website Designer, I use many online portfolio communities, including:
    Chris Grayson at Coroflot Chris Grayson at Krop Chris Grayson at Behance
    I also invite you to follow me on Twitter

  11. #10
    jj1
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    Try looking at web designer's sites from around the world and study their designs and their portfolios. Make a note as you're going along of all the sites you like (eg all the sites which have interesting mastheads, interesting navigation, interesting backgrounds, within the box designs, outside the box designs etc).
    Also, study types of websites - eg hotels, carpentry, florists etc.
    You're not aiming to make an exact copy of someone else's work but to get ideas of what does work and what doesn't.
    Also, try designing websites in a design package like Photoshop or Fireworks BEFORE coding - that means you design what looks good rather than what you can code.
    I now give all customers 3 different designs to choose from based upon their likes and dislikes and the type of business - to start with I found it quite hard to come up with different types of ideas; now it's far easier.
    Keep trying and good luck.


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