Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    4
    Member #
    19678
    I am a graphic designer for a web site and my boss thinks that all my graphics should be about 15k. Now I figure that on graphics with small dimensions, 15k is understandable. However my boss feels that all my graphics need to be around 15k. I do banners and graphics that could exceed 600px x 600px sometimes. Then I have to reduce the quality to virtually a blur to get the k size down. Honestly I don't feel that it is that big of a deal, I know k size always has to be in mind and compress as much as you can, but don't ruin the graphic because your worried about k size. Can someone please let me know what to do. Am I Right? Is my boss right?
    Thanks.

  2.  

  3. #2
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cottage Grove, Minnesota
    Posts
    7,715
    Member #
    5580
    Liked
    717 times
    I think it depends on what the image is ... the purpose of the image.
    And how many there are on one page.

    Give us an example website you did where you have a large image.


  4. #3
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Maryland, US
    Posts
    11,774
    Member #
    3
    Liked
    21 times
    He's an idiot if he thinks all images should be the same resolution. Some should be less than 1 KB while others at 300 KB is acceptable. It completely depends on their purpose and context.

    Also important to know the difference between using a GIF and a JPEG: a GIF is better for images with few colors or necessarily sharp edges, and a JPEG is meant for photographs and also tends to work better with images containing big gradients.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
    Site of the Month contest: submit your site or vote for the winner!

  5. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    4
    Member #
    19678
    Absolutley! I completely understand the difference of GIF and a JPG, and I think my boss does too. I love using Gif's because they are usually much lighter.
    Most of the graphics are for email purposes. So for example, most of the time I will send an email with 1 graphic in it. This graphic will be about 400px x 400px.
    I can make it look very sharp and crisp at about 35-40 Kb. But I am forced to compress it to 15-20Kb.
    Do you think the change in K size really makes that much of a difference? My thought is I'd rather send a heavier more eye-pleasing email than sending a blurring looking mess. When I know today's email capabilities handle a 40Kb email like nothing.
    I may be wrong though, so please give me some input on this. It's an ongoing battle. Thanks in Advance.

  6. #5
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Maryland, US
    Posts
    11,774
    Member #
    3
    Liked
    21 times
    20 KB versus 40 KB is irrelevant in most cases. At those sizes, you'll worry more about mobile users than desktop users.

    Generally, compress the image as much as possible to the point just before it obviously starts to lose quality. Some images by their composition and nature will just have to be lightly compressed, and there's nothing you can do about it. I can make a 1000x1000 image be several hundred bytes without losing any quality, or I can have one that's 400x400 but is several hundred KB because of some intricate detail in it and a large color palette.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
    Site of the Month contest: submit your site or vote for the winner!


Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:14 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com