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  1. #1
    Junior Member GirllikeSam's Avatar
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    -What do you do in an avg days work?
    -What's it like being a web designer for a company?
    -Job Market?
    -What is the avg pay?
    -and would you reccomend going to school for this? Plz take a look at these schools for me and tell me what you think:
    http://www.nitlc.com/
    http://www.herzing.ca/toronto/programs/web-site-design

    ty!

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  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    1) No such thing as an average day for me. I could do anything. I might code CSS/HTML, I might program, I might market, I might write content, I might do stuff in Photoshop, SQL Server, I might have to make phone calls, or I might have to do a bunch of other things. Average is a non-existent word.

    2) I'm freelance. I don't know, and I don't want to know.

    3) I understand why you're asking this, but the problem with that line of thinking is that it's typical. "I need to find work". "What's the job market like for position x?" There's always a market for someone that's skilled enough and will be able to make an employer money, and that's how you should focus yourself.

    4) Depends on my client, their geographic location, the skill set required for the job, and the competition.

    5) I'm confused by your two choices. One's in Toronto and one's in London, England.

    The London one looks really vague and I can't find a course outline...just promises of big money.

    The Herzing one doesn't look too bad overall, but I don't get the order. They're going to teach design and advanced design in the same semester? And learning Flash won't do you much good...it's on the downslope now. This one would come down to cost for me...a few hundred bucks, maybe, but knowing places like this, you're probably looking at a high-four-to-low-five-digit price, which isn't worth it to me.
    GirllikeSam likes this.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Well said,

    I actually get started out in web design for a company I still work for today... But web design is probably about 5% of what I do on a day to day basis...

    Unless you're planning on going to work for a design firm that pumps out design after design , day after day... The job market for working for a company doing nothing but web design is pretty slim.

    Several clients I have do have " design " departments... But they do all their marketing graphics, for every marketing medium you can imagine... Yes they do web design, but the difference between developing a new look or rebranding and maintaining a current ongoing site ... Is the difference between focusing on a project 80% of the time... Or 5% of the time...

    I actually spend more of my free time doing design work for clients... And collaborative projects, than I do as admin for multiple corporate sites.

    That being said, I'm paid really, really good for what I do, but that also includes network security, network and server management, security updates, graphic design for print as well as web, and a few other responsibilities that I won't go into here.

    My old parent company, had over 200 divisions and designed and maintained 400+ web sites... Yes they had about 10 full-time programmers, but the last time I spoke with anyone in that department, they were down to 3 people managing about 40 sub contractors...

    I personally,am completely self-taught, learned what I know from books, trial and error and lots of online tutorials. I enjoy learning, and get a kick out of deciphering how things work and or recreating something to be more efficient ( Ie. Recreate a flash menu in CSS and jquery )... More functional, and better for the site internal linking.

    Everyone learns better from different things, as for would a certification in web design help you land a better paying job? Probably, but that could be a regional thing. Everybody and his brother and sister knows " web design "... Or so they think if they can put some pretty graphs and word on a page that makes them a "webmaster".

    Just so you know, even with a degree or certification in web design, you will be competing with every 12 year old that has a computer and some graphic skills. I taught my daughter at 11 how to do basic web design. By the time she graduated from high school, she was teaching the teachers how to maintain the sites she put together for the school system.

  5. #4
    Senior Member chrisHPZ's Avatar
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    What you say about competing with pre-teens having a computer and graphic skills is actually kind of disturbing webzarus. However, I'm absolutely not finding any fault in your thinking. Not to long ago, last month I think, one of the news networks featured a kid who made a free iPod game that ended up being downloaded over a million times in one day. I'm pretty sure it was Google that wanted to purchase this game and sell it for a buck. If the young programmer had sold his game to Google, again I might be wrong here, he would have been set for money that's for sure. The point that I'm in agreement with you about is that I'm starting to wonder about the importance of having a degree in web design myself when there are so many resources on the internet to learn from. I'm in college myself for this field. I've purchased quite a few books on Adobe's applications that go way outside the scope of my institution's curriculum. Like your distinguished daughter, I can't tell you how many times I've felt that my own self-taught knowledge surpasses my instructors. Granted I do the online college thing, and more often than not most people will say that it takes too long and costs too much to develop field-specific learning material. Well HELLO!!!! Do college's not make enough off of students as it is?

  6. #5
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    if you're in a degree program already, I would never tell anyone NOT to finish the degree. You never walk away from a learning experience. I have actually been in some basic design classes ( my company pays me to take 40 hrs of training a year ), where I actully did pick up on some new things, some trends I had not notices myself, new tools and techniques.

    I've taught some basic HTML classes, and have learned from questions that were posed by some of the students. That's probably the biggest draw for me in this industry, its constantly changing and I love the challenge of learning.

    One thing I warn many about before spending big bucks in getting a degree, this is not an industry that you will ever know everything about everything and that you better enjoy learning if you want to be successful.

    Learn the basics on your own, look at other peoples stuff and try to de-construct it. If you pull all-nighters trying to learn the basics then this is probably something you might enjoy doing and be good at it. If you struggle with the basic concepts of how it all works together, or get frustrated easily at why something doesn't work, then perhaps it's not you.

  7. #6
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    What Webzarus said. The things you learn in the pursuit of a degree may not be applicable to your future path, and much of the knowledge will end up becoming obsolete. You will also never grasp all of it...there's just too much.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

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  8. #7
    Senior Member DanExcell's Avatar
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    The most effective college instructor I had for web design/ development (he did not believe in the wysiwyg and hated it with a passion) has a degree in literature. However, he is a natural computer geek and is good enough to teach at a real university. The point that I think most of these guys are aiming at is diversifying your skill set. Some of the best designers I have read about have degrees in computer science, programming or general IT stuff. However, they are rare commodities in the field, which is why they stand out and are in demand. I actually read on one guys website from California that he is not taking on any new projects at the moment. Who can afford to that in this economy? Apparently he can...

    With that being stated, the only thing I can tell you is this; if its a regular job you need, get into IT. You will find work much faster and the field is not that complex. If you want complexity, constant change, and do not mind competing with thousands on top of thousands of designer on a global scale - jump into the field head first and prepare yourself for constant change.
    I have gotten into the habit of not judging other designers/developers work, but this is my Microsoft Meandering time so I'm MEANDERING...

    Oh, almost forgot: spammers are gender-less parasites...

  9. #8
    WDF Staff George Dolidze's Avatar
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    I really took into consideration what wired said. Since it is so easy the pick up web design skills online, you could get a degree that is applicable, like marketing or business. Just my two cents
    AlphaMare likes this.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member DanExcell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Dolidze, post: 216551
    I really took into consideration what wired said. Since it is so easy the pick up web design skills online, you could get a degree that is applicable, like marketing or business. Just my two cents
    Define Easy...
    I have gotten into the habit of not judging other designers/developers work, but this is my Microsoft Meandering time so I'm MEANDERING...

    Oh, almost forgot: spammers are gender-less parasites...

  11. #10
    Banned
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    Or...get into web hosting AND web design development, then you can do it all :P


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