Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Senior Member Blackhawk095's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kentucky (USA)
    Posts
    384
    Member #
    27969
    Liked
    45 times
    I have a large online form on a website I'm building. I would like to style the email so when the information is sent, it will appear with a more professional look.

    Here is what I'm trying to do:
    (The website form is on the left and the styled email is on the right)



    Here is a screenshot without the extra lines:



    I've been researching the subject for a few hours. The only tutorials I can find involve manually inserting the information into the email. I want this to automatically insert the information submitted from the form.

    I was thinking of inserting HTML and CSS into the PHP, but I don't know if that will work.

    Suggestions?
    [COLOR=rgb(0, 51, 102)]Student Web Designer[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=rgb(0, 51, 102)]If you thought something I said was helpful. LIKE IT![/COLOR]

  2.  

  3. #2
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cottage Grove, Minnesota
    Posts
    7,715
    Member #
    5580
    Liked
    717 times
    First, you should know that not everyone wants to get HTML email.
    In fact, some email clients remove the images until the user allows them to be shown.
    So it becomes almost "too much work" to read HTML emails and so the user doesn't
    really care about the style, the graphics, and the way it looks.

    But, on the other hand, HTML emails look nicer when viewed as HTML emails.

    In your case, it looks like the user fills out a tech request (or contact) form and the email
    gets sent to the tech people (team). What I mean by that is, the form isn't going to your
    customers, it's going to the company that is running the website.

    That makes me wonder ... why do you even need to use email to show the data?
    If it were me, the teacher would fill out the form (which looks very nice by the way),
    and then their data is put into a MySQL database. BUT ... when that happens,
    I would get an email notifying me, with a link to a script that accesses the database ... AND
    I would get an SMS message on my smart phone if I chose to do that. No matter where I
    was, I would know that a teacher has asked for help (in real time). I could access the
    request on my smart phone as well as with my email.

    If I couldn't answer the request, I could "pass it along" to someone else by re-assigning
    the ticket number to another team member. Because email wasn't used for the data,
    any other team member could access the database and see the data. You can't do that
    with email unless you forward it to another team member.

    For me, I would not even use email for the teacher's form. The only email I would use
    is an email back to the teacher, to confirm their "help ticket" number, and give status
    on their request.
    Webzarus likes this.


  4. #3
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina Coast
    Posts
    3,322
    Member #
    27709
    Liked
    770 times
    I've created several web based help desk ticket systems over the years, like msleim says, it's better to enter the data into a mysql db. This not only is more efficient but provides many advantages.

    1. It creates a running punch list of items that need to be addressed.
    2. They can be assigned based on terms entered ( or if you offer the user some type of category selection ). Or re-assigned and or re categorized appropriately if needed.
    3. It creates a knowledge base of fixes, so those that may no be familiar with a particular issue, but have to address an issue ( for whatever reason ), will have access to the knowledge.
    4. Companies that have to maintain SOX compliance have an audit trail for those issues.
    5. Reminders can be sent if an issue is not resolved or closed in a timely manner.
    6. Probably more I just can't think of without another cup of coffee.

    As for the email, that's your choice.

    HTML email with CSS.

    Just create a generic email template with the HTML and CSS ( it's best to embed the CSS in the email ) some clients don't display remotely referenced CSS properly even if the CSS file is on a server that the client can see. You can reference images hosted on a remote server, or you can embed the images, but many clients don't display images without users telling them to do so.

    Once you have the template created, dump the form information and send it.

    If done properly, the email will display the HTML email properly in the clients that allow HTML, and display as formatted text in those that don't.

    Not really that difficult.

    Oh, one other benefit of this type of system, you can send a completed email to the original requestor explaining what you've done and that it's complete, and they can either approve or if their original request was mis interpreted ( it happens more than you think ), they can reenter more details to help the IT person address the issue at hand. I sent a HTML CSS formatted email for this that has CSS buttons. If they click the approve button, the request is closed, if not it opens a page for them to enter more details.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Andrew Yurlov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,306
    Member #
    27566
    Liked
    181 times
    Quote Originally Posted by mlseim, post: 229068
    First, you should know that not everyone wants to get HTML email.
    In fact, some email clients remove the images until the user allows them to be shown.
    So it becomes almost "too much work" to read HTML emails and so the user doesn't
    really care about the style, the graphics, and the way it looks.

    But, on the other hand, HTML emails look nicer when viewed as HTML emails.

    In your case, it looks like the user fills out a tech request (or contact) form and the email
    gets sent to the tech people (team). What I mean by that is, the form isn't going to your
    customers, it's going to the company that is running the website.

    That makes me wonder ... why do you even need to use email to show the data?
    If it were me, the teacher would fill out the form (which looks very nice by the way),
    and then their data is put into a MySQL database. BUT ... when that happens,
    I would get an email notifying me, with a link to a script that accesses the database ... AND
    I would get an SMS message on my smart phone if I chose to do that. No matter where I
    was, I would know that a teacher has asked for help (in real time). I could access the
    request on my smart phone as well as with my email.

    If I couldn't answer the request, I could "pass it along" to someone else by re-assigning
    the ticket number to another team member. Because email wasn't used for the data,
    any other team member could access the database and see the data. You can't do that
    with email unless you forward it to another team member.

    For me, I would not even use email for the teacher's form. The only email I would use
    is an email back to the teacher, to confirm their "help ticket" number, and give status
    on their request.
    wow. I admire your knowledge. How good are you with php? You seem to be able to answer questions to just about anything involving back end stuff.
    Artificial intelligence is nothing compared to natural stupidity -Someone

    Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks.
    But of course, if you dig deeper, itís really how it works.
    -Steve Jobs



  6. #5
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cottage Grove, Minnesota
    Posts
    7,715
    Member #
    5580
    Liked
    717 times
    I know enough about PHP to be dangerous, but I learn new things every day.
    In fact, by answering a scripting question by someone asking for help, I sometimes
    learn the most. I have to teach myself before I can answer the question. Google
    is the biggest help. And I have done some pretty strange scripts for various clients.
    It sort of forces you to think outside the box.

    Andrew ... seeing your signature ... have you ever seen this site:
    http://clientsfromhell.net/
    Blackhawk095 and Ronald Roe like this.


  7. #6
    Senior Member Andrew Yurlov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,306
    Member #
    27566
    Liked
    181 times
    Quote Originally Posted by mlseim, post: 229125
    I know enough about PHP to be dangerous, but I learn new things every day.
    In fact, by answering a scripting question by someone asking for help, I sometimes
    learn the most. I have to teach myself before I can answer the question. Google
    is the biggest help. And I have done some pretty strange scripts for various clients.
    It sort of forces you to think outside the box.

    Andrew ... seeing your signature ... have you ever seen this site:
    http://clientsfromhell.net/
    Haha yea its a really cool site. Always go there when im bored with nothing to do.
    Artificial intelligence is nothing compared to natural stupidity -Someone

    Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks.
    But of course, if you dig deeper, itís really how it works.
    -Steve Jobs




Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

php css html for adding email notification

,

php html approve button in email

Click on a term to search for related topics.
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:31 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com