Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Senior Member Alanna Baxter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    188
    Member #
    29061
    Liked
    18 times
    I will not claim to be an expert in web design but I have a passion for it. Whenever I have a website to do, it's all I can think about: design, layout, colors, ways to improve it, etc.

    So I came across a training program whereby if I take the course and pass the two exams I'll be a Certified Webmaster I. So from a hiring point of view, which would be better? Having some sort of certification on paper that proves what you know? Or actual examples via a portfolio of sites? What will give a client more piece of mind? Or a website company looking to hire someone?

    I don't want to get bogged down in a lot of training. I'd rather be putting my efforts into actually working on sites, however, if you are looking to improve your skills and add value to your clients' sites maybe some structured training wouldn't hurt?

    Any thoughts?

  2.  

  3. #2
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cottage Grove, Minnesota
    Posts
    7,715
    Member #
    5580
    Liked
    717 times
    You've touched on "design" ... what about "development"?
    Nobody wants just a static web page anymore. It's all about dynamic
    content, information processing, CMS, databases, social aspects.
    Will that "webmaster" course teach HTML5, CSS3, PHP, MySQL, JQuery, AJAX, etc?

    If they don't teach that (and I'm guessing they don't), you pretty much won't get hired.
    You must have development skills (advanced scripting abilities) to get a job.

    Now, if you're really interested in "design", and you're good at graphics, photoshop, etc,
    then you might get hired for graphic design, GUI (graphic user interfaces) for mobile
    web online apps. I read lately that almost 50% of the internet users are now using
    mobile devices daily for their internet activities. I think web page design, as in desktops
    is pretty much a dying art (that's my opinion though).

    Mobile sites are specifically designed for "simple, back to basics". With efficient
    eye-popping graphics, and great GUI, layouts, etc. you might find a niche to having
    the ability to really create some great online apps and mobile sites for companies.
    It's all about the user's experience. If they can easily navigate a company's mobile
    site and instantly get the information they are seeking, that's the home-run a
    company needs. They would hire a designer that can accomplish that.
    Alanna Baxter likes this.


  4. #3
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,485
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    "There's no excuse for experience."

    That, and as mlseim said, development is where it's at. There are lots of good designers...there are very few good developers. Learn programming...really learn it...and you'll always find work.
    Alanna Baxter likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  5. #4
    Senior Member Alanna Baxter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    188
    Member #
    29061
    Liked
    18 times
    Thanks for the feedback, guys. After looking over the syllabus for this course I realized I took a similar course to this one a few years back at an Adobe training center. This one is supposed to be up to the same standard as the Adobe certification. It has a few more modules but I'm thinking that perhaps if I just revisit the course material from a few years ago and take the exam I'll get the Adobe Webmaster I certification.That will give me something on paper but it will be pretty bare bones. It's mainly Dreamweaver with a little Photoshop.

    I'm very interested in the development side of things and actually prefer it. It's nice to play around with Photoshop and it's necessary if you want to give a client a few choices but I agree that the nuts and bolts of a site will have really good functionality. I see really cool stuff on sites and would love to mimic it but a lot of the time I don't even know what it's called. I know HTML, CSS, Dreamweaver, and a bit of Photoshop that I taught myself out of necessity. I'm dying to learn PHP but haven't been able to find a decent course for it. The Lynda courses I've been looking at already have the code snippets so I'm not learning how to create code. Are you guys self-taught? Did you just buy some books and have at it? I haven't seen anything about AJAX. Don't know what that is but I would love to learn more developing techniques. It's frustrating because there's so much to learn but I'm not sure where to start. Most people/potential clients I talk with want control of their website so they are willing to let you design it and set it up but they want you to give it back to them so they can make the updates. Which is why I've been leaning toward PHP recently. Wordpress seems to be the simplest to design and give back to a client.

    I had an interview for a junior web position last summer. Interview went great. I was sure I'd be called back for the second round but didn't make the cut. I'm sure that while I may have wowed them personally, I probably lacked the experience they were looking for. The waiting area was full of people that looked like they had been doing web work for quite some time. I know there's a lot of competition out there and I'd really like to be able to compete. Then there's the whole ageism thing. Are older more experienced people getting hired or are companies looking to hire college grads? (I'm in the older/wiser category!

  6. #5
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina Coast
    Posts
    3,322
    Member #
    27709
    Liked
    770 times
    Age really doesn't matter, but a nice portfolio will open a lot of doors... It doesn't have to be a portfolio of a hundred sites... Trust me, someone making the hiring decision is only going to look at a couple, so say... If you have 5-10 really good examples of your design skills, where each one stands on its own, and each one shows different abilities and has its own look and feel...

    As for certifications ??? That's a tough one... Looks good on paper... But from a hiring decision aspect, there are so many certifications out there that mean 1 thing... You can follow instructions and take test...

    Now if you portfolio can back up the certification... Different story.

    If I had a dollar for every certification I've seen on resumes, but the people couldn't even do a basic layout with a wysiwyg editor... I'd be very rich.

    Probably the most impressive resume and portfolio I have reviewed for a client was from a designer that had a "lab" on their site... Where they had examples of their code, theirs own online editor and testing program... Showing their "development skills", and that they were much more than just a wysiwyg designer. Examples of some pretty strong DB and data management scripts.

    Companies looking to hire college grads are going to do that no matter wht your skill level ? Why ? Because they arent looking to pay a whole lot...

    There are several " cutting edge, new design companies " in my local area that promise designers "opportunities" ... Problem is, they have hired on average 10 new designers in the past year...

  7. #6
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,485
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    To follow up on what Webzarus is saying...as many of you are all too aware by now, I'm the project manager for a website for the first time. The owner and I have been using oDesk to try and find a developer. One of the things you can do with oDesk is look at test scores, which do tell some of the story...however, we're also looking at experience and portfolio, with a greater emphasis on portfolio. Some of the top "testers" have sites in their portfolio with table-based layouts and code that was obviously generated from Dr*amw*av*r....if you're any kind of a programmer, you won't allow for that to happen. Even if you didn't create the HTML/CSS parts yourself, you should have enough skill to recognize a dog's breakfast of code.

    So yeah, the portfolio is EVERYTHING and it's done a great job at weeding out the scrubs. The trouble is it hasn't led us to our guy/girl either.
    Alanna Baxter likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  8. #7
    Senior Member Alanna Baxter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    188
    Member #
    29061
    Liked
    18 times
    Thanks, guys. I did not know that you were a project manager on a website, THEGAME1264. Well done! So bottom line is learn to code really well and set up a decent portfolio. I love the idea of actually putting examples of code on your portfolio. That's a great idea!

    At the moment, I should have 4 sites done by Fall. (Hopefully more to come!) I'm working on one now and there's a few more coming to me closer to summer. They are small but hopefully I can make them effective.

    I have to ask, tho, THEGAME1264, is using Dreamweaver a bad thing? I don't really use it much right now. The site I did with Dreamweaver was a static site for a training company and I had just taken the course so it was useful. The sites I'm doing now I have to hand back to the clients because they want to manage them so I'm steering toward Wordpress with child themes.

    I found a place where I can learn for free and get a certification:
    http://www.w3schools.com/default.asp

    So it looks like there's room for me in this field.

    Thanks.

  9. #8
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,485
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    It's a bad thing simply because if you use the WYSIWYG side of things (as most people tend to do), it generates bloated and outdated code.

    You can learn for free at W3Schools. Not sure about their "certification", though...never bothered with it.
    Alanna Baxter likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  10. #9
    Senior Member Alanna Baxter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    188
    Member #
    29061
    Liked
    18 times
    I've been using Notepad++ for quite a while now and prefer it. It's easier read and to pick out what you are looking for and I like the fact that the lines are numbered. Plus, it's free.

    I'll continue on with W3Schools. They have a lot of free tutorials of stuff I want to learn.

  11. #10
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,485
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    Yeah, it's a much better alternative to the Adobe evil product.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)


Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:46 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com