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  1. #1
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    I am in a group of 3 students for our web design class. Our assignment is to re-design a website for a community center that provides a variety of services for seniors and low income families.

    The representative visited our class and we conducted an interview with him. I also took a tour of the website and noticed a few items that we could re-design.

    I believe that we could start by individually auditing the website and then share/brainstorm ideas in a meeting sometime this week. Here are my additional questions before we begin the real work:

    1. How would you divide up the website responsibilities among 3 people?

    2. What are the web project production steps for a small team?

    Other suggestions or ideas would be helpful.

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  3. #2
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    Everyone comes up with a basic layout and function of how it will look and operate.
    That means, it's easy to use (for seniors), easy to read, simple. You already know
    what features are required ... make it all intuitive to someone who doesn't use
    the internet for very many things.

    One person does the graphics and color, layout design.
    One person does the XHTML/CSS/javascripting/PHP/MySQL scripting ... or whatever is used.
    The 3rd person who knows the most, helps with both where needed.

    What is the age group of the students?
    Is this high school, college?
    Andrew Yurlov likes this.


  4. #3
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    So what was the reason for the re-design, perhaps that may have a bearing on what needs to be improved ?

    If its just an visual makeover... Not really a big deal how you do it, like msleim said, divide it up that way is fine so everyone gets exposed to everything.

    On the otherhand, if there is a "real need" or reason behind the makeover, usability issues, etc... Perhaps enlisting the advice of some people that actually have experience would be a consideration. It's one thing to have good ideas, but another to actually know how to best address accessibility and usability issues.

    I understand that this is a class project, but I in the real world, if usability and accessibility are hardly ever properly addressed and more times ignored simply because they are not understood and deemed un necessary by those that don't have to interact at those levels. It's not until you HAVE TO use a screen reader that you understand just how important basic accessibility is.

    Just a thought

  5. #4
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    We are a college group.

    The client wants a visual re-design only, and we have to create a look that modernizes the website.

    Second question: How important is it to create a functional requirements/information architecture document for the visual re-design of a website? I don't believe we're going to make huge changes to the current site's architecture. We might need to create additional pages within the categories.

    Should we complete an audit of the current website and create a new sitemap/navigation hierarchy for the re-design?

  6. #5
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    For any project, I usually start with a simple wireframe with the site to be provided to the client for approval.

    Along with a visual markup of graphic/color changes.

    This way, there is a reference to what is being agreed upon by both parties.

    Scope creep is your enemy, wireframes keep scope creep to a minimum. Anything "extra" is covered in the contract, so when clients want changes "mid stream", I send them a revised contract and wireframe for approval of the changes... So extra fees for the requested "additional changes" can be justified, and and the end of the project, there are no surprises.

    I insist in contracts for every client, along with requiring 1 or at least 2 approves, there is an understanding that once the original project scope is defined, and changes to that require approval for their purposes and mine.

    There are some really nice wireframe programs out there now, but for my needs they are just overkilll, I use my graphics program to create something simple... Goes into the client file... So in case of changes...

    In average, I get one change request for every 5-6 clients I work with, only 1 time did I actually have to refer to it to get the extra payment.


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