Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3
    Member #
    33514
    Hello all...

    I have been out of the business for a bit... I graduated in 2003 and worked many years in boutique firms and stuff... I've always done a little bit of everything... Never really honed in on a specialty... I assume this is pretty common...

    However, I've been considering getting back into it again...

    Any suggestions on what is required as an entry-level or returning worker? I never got far into CSS, don't know HTML5... I just feel like I would have a lot of catching up to do if I were to get into it again...

    Would it be more worth it to decide what I want to do? Like for example, if I wanted to do print and focus more on the artsy side of things... Should I just build up a portfolio in that sense? Is there much of a demand for that? Print? Web? I feel half and half on the web stuff because so much has gone into mobile devices and social networking, which are things that I'm really not interested in...

    I always wanted to do something fun in this field, that would coincide well with my music playing and other creative endeavors...

    Any input?

    Thanks

  2.  

  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    I can sum up all of my thoughts on your question in two sentences.

    Web designers are pretty much a dime a dozen now...apologies to the pretty picture drawers of the world, but it's the harsh reality of your business.
    Web developers...really good web developers...are a rare breed, and there's a lot of demand out there for a good web developer.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  4. #3
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina Coast
    Posts
    3,322
    Member #
    27709
    Liked
    770 times
    As TheGame said, web designers are a dime a dozen these days.

    You have the slicers and divers that use programs to take an image and turn it into w website, you have those that can only modify Wordpress to a clients needs. Then there are others that rely completely on one of he high end programs to point and click their way to a web site.

    To me, as someone who occasionally hires and or assist others to hire designers, all of the above are useless to me and my clients.

    If you want to focus on something that will advance your potential in this industry. Focus on standards based design. Learn and understand CSS and XHTML. HTML5 and CSS3 will come easier to you later once you have a good understanding of the basics. Design technologies are like math, you build on what you already know... Trying to jump into the latest and greatest is like trying to learn calculus without much knowlegde of algebra. Sure, it can be learned, but its much easier if you understand what came before it.

    As for PRINT/WEB ... That's a VERY SMALL niche market.

    Mobile and social are really not that difficult and many clients want it, but don't need it. Out of 40 clients I have 2 that can actually benefit from some sort of social web stuff, but just about everyone of them have ask for it at one time or another. Mobile is about the same... Both are very client dependant... But most cannot or won't benefit from either.

    Assuming you know the basics of HTML, if you can code a site by hand, or take a template or site already created, and just using notepad or any other text editor, make changes and or modify it to work, then you're already way ahead of many so called "designers".

    Design by itself is severely limited, to grow a business in this industry, you will have to have some development skills. Development is more of a logic and programming where design is more of a visual and coding thing.

  5. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3
    Member #
    33514
    Thanks for your input so far... A lot of it makes sense... I guess I still don't fully understand what the typical day is like for a web developer, and how do I know this is something that is going to be around awhile? I have a hard time invisioning what it would belike to be 59 on the virge of retirement, sitting in front of a computer making a banner rain clipart money (lol that is the more cynical stuff coming out) But seriously, I'm interested in most aspects of what I learned at school including flash, motion graphics, making posters and stuff... I'm especially interested in the visual stuff, photoshop, etc... Although I do get a bit of a tickle for the technology side and coding can actually be fun... I just don't want to get into corporate ******** and sell my soul speaking to morons. I don't know, maybe I've just had some bad experiences and I could look at it differently, but before I jump back in I want to know that the only reason I have health insurance is not so I can afford medication to help with how insane everything is making me... Again, the more cynical side, but I'm in a funny mood right now... Thanks again

  6. #5
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    If you're a good developer, there's no such thing as a "typical day", but here would be the closest facsimile thereof, using the general events day as an example:

    8 AM: send wife off to work and daughter to Grandma's.
    8 AM - 9:00 AM: check email, eat breakfast while I ramp up by working on things for my own benefit.
    9:00 - 10:00 AM: if there's anything crisis or important, deal with it. Possibly a morning phone meeting. Usually not the case, though.
    10:00 AM - 12:30 PM: Create code to cater to clients' various needs and wants. Listen to podcasts in the background and/or watch videos that actually contain something of substance.
    12:30 PM - 1:30 PM - check email again, eat lunch while I work on things for my own benefit.
    1:30 PM - 5:00 PM: Create code to cater to clients' various needs and wants. Possibly research other code ideas and example. Maybe check email one more time here.
    5:00 PM: Stop as my wife brings my daughter home and I get attacked by a hyperactive 16-month-old girl.

    Now, I'm not a typical developer...or a typical anything. But if you want to be a freelance developer, that's the way to do it. And this schedule often varies, depending on things like the phone calls I get throughout the day, important emails (even though I don't check them, I get alerts when all emails come in), Skype messages, etc.

    Flash? I haven't even opened an .FLA file in 3.5 years and really would rather not. I had to work with a Flash developer recently and it hasn't changed my take on it anyway. It's becoming more bloated and more useless as things like jQuery emerge, and it wasn't all that useful to begin with. If you're good at it, can apply knowledge of it, and make a go of it, by all means do so...but the odds of you do that are going to be greater as time goes on.

    Most of my clients are either small business owners or at least decision makers. I refuse to deal with anyone even remotely corporate either, and there's more than enough work out there so that I don't have to. If someone starts spouting off about "infrastructure" or "moving forward" or "synergy" or any of the other buzzwords, I don't listen...and if that person is trying to put me "in my place" or talking down to me in any way, that person usually learns in a big hurry that it's not a wise choice of action.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  7. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3
    Member #
    33514
    If you don't mind me asking, where do you get most of your clients, and how do you avoid others acting like the boss when they hire you? It is my impression that the ideal is to have a service to offer, and you get paid for that service. Far too often, ads are posted and businesses are interested that want to call the shots. If I were to freelance, I'd want to know that I had the ability to do things on my schedule, in my own headspace... Otherwise, they can hire me, give me a nice desk and benefits. Do you know what I mean?

  8. #7
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    There's no one source. I get some from oDesk. I picked up some by word of mouth. Some found me. Some were people I've known prior to web development.

    There really isn't a way to avoid people trying to treat you like an indentured servant, since that's individual. Some people are just going to do that regardless of what you tell them, so I walk away from those people. I had a guy last year that I had to do that with, and he got so mad that he actually tried to forbid me from speaking to any of my other clients. Fortunately for me, he's a "professional" in an industry that has a very strict code of conduct, so he's now got a disciplinary case pending.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)


Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:21 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com