Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Member Reza O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    53
    Member #
    33634
    Liked
    1 times
    I have taken an html 4.01 course. Where they taught us everything except framesets. In addition to that I have taken a CSS, Dreamweaver, Fireworks class where we were taught the CSS inside of Dreamweaver and not by doing it manually. Is this enough to get a job in Web Design? Or do I need to learn to do CSS manually? I am also going to be taking courses in Flash, Javascript, PHP/MYSQL and E-commerce. Thanks in advance for your help and insight.

  2.  

  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    The bad news: you're heading down the wrong path, through no fault of your own (I blame whatever third-rate Everest College wannabe institution that prepared that course).
    The good news: you haven't gotten very far yet.

    Dr*amw*av*r will never, never, never get you where you want to go. There is absolutely no substitute for the acquisition of the ability to code by hand. Period. So yes, you'll need to learn it.

    HTML 4.01 is basically dead. It has limited use, but you can either go the HTML5 route or XHTML (here's a chart that gives you a general idea of the differences) and you'll be fine.

    Flash? To quote John Mellencamp, "this may not be the end of the world, but you can see it from here."

    Javascript? Very useful, although I'd learn a framework such as jQuery.

    PHP/MySQL? Not a fan of both personally, but they definitely have their uses and I won't deny that.

    E-Commerce: I'll tell you right now that you will not learn what you need to know from any course on the topic. You can't. There are simply too many variables (nature of the business, marketing plan, target market, whether or not automatic rebilling is required, how to tailor the shopping cart to meet a customer's needs, etc.) E-commerce isn't a "topic" or a "course", but rather the extension of applied knowledge to a group of different aspects of design and more importantly development.

    In other words, your school's sending you down the garden path.
    Reza O and AlphaMare like this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  4. #3
    Member Reza O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    53
    Member #
    33634
    Liked
    1 times
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264, post: 243521
    The bad news: you're heading down the wrong path, through no fault of your own (I blame whatever third-rate Everest College wannabe institution that prepared that course).
    The good news: you haven't gotten very far yet.

    Dr*amw*av*r will never, never, never get you where you want to go. There is absolutely no substitute for the acquisition of the ability to code by hand. Period. So yes, you'll need to learn it.

    HTML 4.01 is basically dead. It has limited use, but you can either go the HTML5 route or XHTML (here's a chart that gives you a general idea of the differences) and you'll be fine.

    Flash? To quote John Mellencamp, "this may not be the end of the world, but you can see it from here."

    Javascript? Very useful, although I'd learn a framework such as jQuery.

    PHP/MySQL? Not a fan of both personally, but they definitely have their uses and I won't deny that.

    E-Commerce: I'll tell you right now that you will not learn what you need to know from any course on the topic. You can't. There are simply too many variables (nature of the business, marketing plan, target market, whether or not automatic rebilling is required, how to tailor the shopping cart to meet a customer's needs, etc.) E-commerce isn't a "topic" or a "course", but rather the extension of applied knowledge to a group of different aspects of design and more importantly development.

    In other words, your school's sending you down the garden path.
    This is the CIW curriculum for becoming a web designer. I forgot to mention that... And I am taking CIW certified courses. I designed a website from a .psd template. It was a 6 page website. I used Dreamweaver. Do you think I can get a job in web design knowing what I know now? Or do I have to learn CSS manually first. You're saying that this curriculum is taking me down the green path. So what do you suggest I do to be able to be good enough to get a job as a web designer? I appreciate your comments and am looking forward to your next reply.

  5. #4
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    What is CIW? I've never heard of it (keep in mind, I'm in Canada).

    And based on what you know now, I'd say no, you wouldn't, even if you learned CSS manually. The big problem that you have facing you is one very few people in the web design community understand, and that is the competition and the lack of distinguishing elements. Right now, you know some of the basic elements of web design, and you've been taught using archaic code standards and principles. Even if you had been taught using current code standards and principles, you'd still be behind since pretty much everyone and their brother is a designer. "Do you know Bob? He does websites and he lives in your city." Anyone with any experience in the web industry has wanted to slit their own throat every time they've heard it. Web designers are a dime a dozen, and that's if they're not behind the 8-ball like you've put yourself in.

    This is where the PHP/MySQL comes into play. At this point, you start to become a web developer. Those are much harder to find...if you can learn to code and code properly, then you're going to give yourself a leg up.

    Now, if you really want a leg up, there is one skill you will need. However, I can guarantee you that it's not a skill you'll be taught in any academic institution of any sort, since it pertains to the ability to apply knowledge to solve a problem. You look at a site or you look at a project and say "I can use X, Y, and Z to do the job, and I can build A, B, and C tools for you." If you can do that, and you can learn the technical skills required to apply knowledge to solve problems, then you'll never, ever have trouble finding something to do. Unfortunately, you either have the skill or at least the basic ability to acquire it or you don't, and it's not something someone can just say "here's how you do it".

    I'm not trying to discourage you when I say these things, by the way...I'm just trying to steer you in a better direction than the dinosauric education system will.
    AlphaMare, Eis and Reza O like this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  6. #5
    Member Reza O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    53
    Member #
    33634
    Liked
    1 times
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264, post: 243526
    What is CIW? I've never heard of it (keep in mind, I'm in Canada).
    CIW is an international organization that has certified web design courses. You can find out more about it at www.ciwcertified.com. BTW I went into your Toronto web design. It was nicely done. I have a question though...How do you make the menu not scroll with the rest of the page? I noticed when you scroll whatever is under the menu scrolls but the menu keeps coming with you. I would love to know how that's done. Thanks for all your help so far.

    Reza

  7. #6
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    That's called "fixed positioning". That site is basically an experimental platform for me since I can't use it to get clients (got all I can handle, hence the reason I don't have a telephone or contact address on my site...I don't want to be bothered by people I can't deal with), and it will be changed at some point in the next few months (it's #3 or #4 on my priority list of sites for myself).

    As far as that organization is concerned, I don't know where or how you heard of it, and I don't blame you for wanting to be "certified"...it looks better when you are. The thing with CIW is that...well, I haven't heard of it, Mare hasn't heard of it, and I would suggest to you that the majority of people haven't either. It's an "organization" that doesn't even include its own address. Most prospective employers that would see the certification would do some basic research, find this, and you'd pretty well be out of the running at that point.

    I'm not sure where you're from in the world, but if you're looking for a job and you're thinking a certification would help you get it, then you're better off getting a certification from a brick-and-mortar institution that would be recognized wherever you live (and not in that Everest College "someone actually WENT there to learn web design?" kind of way.)
    Reza O likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  8. #7
    Member Reza O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    53
    Member #
    33634
    Liked
    1 times
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264, post: 243626
    That's called "fixed positioning". That site is basically an experimental platform for me since I can't use it to get clients (got all I can handle, hence the reason I don't have a telephone or contact address on my site...I don't want to be bothered by people I can't deal with), and it will be changed at some point in the next few months (it's #3 or #4 on my priority list of sites for myself).

    As far as that organization is concerned, I don't know where or how you heard of it, and I don't blame you for wanting to be "certified"...it looks better when you are. The thing with CIW is that...well, I haven't heard of it, Mare hasn't heard of it, and I would suggest to you that the majority of people haven't either. It's an "organization" that doesn't even include its own address. Most prospective employers that would see the certification would do some basic research, find this, and you'd pretty well be out of the running at that point.

    I'm not sure where you're from in the world, but if you're looking for a job and you're thinking a certification would help you get it, then you're better off getting a certification from a brick-and-mortar institution that would be recognized wherever you live (and not in that Everest College "someone actually WENT there to learn web design?" kind of way.)
    Is the fixed positioning done via html and css or do you use Javascript or PHP to do that. Or is it Position=fix in CSS? CIW is in U.S.. I live in Los Angeles and want to get a job here but I am traveling abroad right now. I gave you their website. Did you take a look?

    Thanks for your replies.

  9. #8
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,483
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    HTML/CSS.

    And I did take a look at the website. That's why I made the comments I did...you're not likely to find a job with a certification from these clowns.
    Reza O likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  10. #9
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina Coast
    Posts
    3,322
    Member #
    27709
    Liked
    770 times
    If you read back on some of my post you'll find this is my answer to your question.

    NO

    Now to explain. Learning how to run a program is fine if you wanna do hobby sites and or a personal site... You might even get lucky and find someone that will hire you to make a site.

    If you really want to make a living in this industry... Learn the basics.. Forget the certifications... Learn how to hand code.

    Over the last 2 years I have either hired or assisted clients in hiring web designers to maintain some pretty complicated sites... When I run the ads seeking applicants I specifically define the ability to troubleshoot HTML, CSS, JavaScript etc.... I still get people applying and or getting to the interview that forget to mention that their only real experience has been with one wysiwyg editor or another...

    During the interview I give the a page that has some problems ( usually very simple problems ), and I give them access to notepad... That's it... If they can't do basic troubleshooting with notepad, they are useless to me.

    Most of the times, the sites they will be providing updates and maintenance to are already complete and functioning sites... I rarely hire to create something new... Unless their "portfolio" really wows me... But if they can't use notepad or metapad to do the basics... Again, they are useless to me.

    BTW... Do you have a portfolio ? Most people ( unless they are friends ), are not even going to consider hiring someone without being able to see what you can do...

    Even if its a wysiwyg desing ... You need to show your skills...

    So the answer to your original question is still no

  11. #10
    Senior Member Fireproofgfx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    839
    Member #
    31498
    Liked
    171 times
    I am going to go say the opposite of the previous replies(though their points are spot on) and I will say yes you probably can pick up some work here and there only because I have done it myself with limited knowledge (heck I am still trying to learn it everything).

    I started out slicing psd's in photoshop and coding the site in Dreamweaver. I then moved on from that and started coding using tables in Dreamweaver and then moved onto now using only Divs. So I have been growing over the the course of a few years now, but even when I was designing sliced websites I had people contacting me to design them a website so I was still making money and at the same time growing in my knowledge. Grant it, it was enough money to live on but I have a full time job as a Carpenter so this is and has always been a side gig anyways.

    My goal, as it should be for any aspiring web designer, is to have the knowledge and ability to hand code with out the use of Dreamweaver, but I noticed over time how simple it is to get stuck in your ways and to continue just using Dreamweaver, that's where the Game got it right by say Dreamweaver will never get you where you need to be.
    AlphaMare likes this.


Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:19 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com