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  1. #1
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    Hey folks, I'm hoping someone out there has some insight and advice for me. I am being asked to post files to my employer's website that were created in Powerpoint. Basically they are instructions/wiring diagrams/troubleshooting manuals with 40+ slides per file, and buttons which navigate to various pages depending upon the viewer's needs. Some of the slides have simple animation. These files are intended to be helpful to our customers, however a large majority of them will be viewed on mobile devices. Does anybody have any advice on whether I should convert these files, what type they should be converted to, and do I need a separate "mobile" version for each file so the will be viewable on smart phones, ipads, etc?

    Please keep in mind that I am not a web developer. I do manage/update this company's website but I am a print designer by training. Everything else I've learned by googling and trial by fire. Any help is appreciated!!

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  3. #2
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    Converting to HTML sucks ... you'll lose animations, etc.
    Converting to Flash will eliminate the mobile devices (like Apple products).

    If it were me, I would convert everything to PDF files and eliminate the animations.
    PDF is the most portable and for wiring diagrams, instructions, manuals, etc., it is
    the most widely used method.

    They may have to create a totally new "user instruction manual", or "maintenance
    manual" using PDF. Since they used Powerpoint to begin with, I guess it reflects
    a little bit on what type of technical skills they use for their operations.


  4. #3
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Actually, almost all smartphones are capable of displaying and playing .pps ( presentation files )... And ppt ( native PowerPoint presentation ) files.

    Converting to PDF is an option as a downloadable selection for the few that may not have a PowerPoint viewer installed ( which you would have a link to a free downloadable pps viewer on any page that the power points are displayed on ).

    I personally would suggest to them to find a more "web friendly" format to do this in because limiting thier documentation to a MS FORMAT, they may be limiting potential customers.

    The biggest problem with converting ppt to PDF is the size issue... Sometimes people that create PPT tend to overdue the the graphics thinking they are needed... But if the images have not been optimized before the conversion, the finished PDF will be huge too.

    There's really not a simple point and click answer... Believe me, I've been down this road more than once, sometimes getting the client on the right track is tougher than the conversion process.

    If you go the PDF conversion, don't go with the free converter, have the client but the real deal, it will give you the most conversion and compression options while not degrading the files.

    Good luck

  5. #4
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    I think they should redo them ... using some other graphic method and then make them PDF.
    Why not even have most of it black and white? Diagrams, instructions, manuals ... do they
    need to be in color?

    Out of curiosity, what is the business ... and do you have an example of their Powerpoint?


  6. #5
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    You're right, depending on what theses "instruction manuals" are about would determine the appropriateness of color, animations etc...

    And of course their target audience

  7. #6
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    Thank you both for your input. The files are troubleshooting manuals for electric golf cart motor controls (super niche). Like I said, the animations are simple, so they can be omitted. So perhaps rebuilding as PDFs is the best solution.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    If they are not massive files... No need to rebuild or reinvent the wheel

    Above acrobat can and will convert the to PDF without you having to do anything...

    Before you start, just make sure the images are optimized to 96 dpi ( this is a MS default ), and in adobe, select the "optimize for web" option... What that will do is display the first page while its downloading the rest in the background.

    If they are massive size ... You may want to convert to something else before PDF... But that's more of a trial and error process depending on the docs your working with.

  9. #8
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    oh my, that powerpoint presentation took a long time to load on my PC.
    I finally gave up waiting. That being said before ... maybe something
    isn't set up right on my PC, but I do have MS Office.

    Do the PDF thing for the printed docs.
    Maybe do some Youtube videos for actual work being done. Like a tutorial.


  10. #9
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    Thank you mlseim and Webzarus for your input. I've made a PDF from the first PPT and it's coming in at 600 KB, so I'm going to go with that. They'll just have to deal with losing the animations.

    Thanks!

  11. #10
    Senior Member Kayo's Avatar
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    Google Docs allows you to view powerpoint presentations online. You could give that a try.


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