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  1. #1
    Junior Member SamuelMSr's Avatar
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    Hello all and thank you for taking the time to read my post. I am in need of some advice.

    I would very much like to learn how to develop web sites, from the ground up with all the features and programming included to make full rich interactive sites (like we see out there every day).

    I have some basic knowledge of HTML, CSS and some other bits and pieces. I read a book about ASP.NET and some other misc stuff, but nothing to really get a good handle on things.

    I need some advice on almost a "lesson plan" of sorts. Where to start and where to go from there...

    There are so many choices out there to learn:

    HTML5
    Java
    PHP/SQL
    ASP.NET
    C#/VB#
    MS SQL
    CSS

    and the list goes on forever...

    I know HTML and CSS are the core of any website and are a must, but where do I go from there?

    Also, do I want to use Dreamweaver or Visual Studio or just something like Notepad ++?

    I know there are a lot of schools out there that offer training in these things, but without going into a huge story that no one here wants to hear, I just need to learn this myself.

    I can buy some items, especially books and I can even get a copy of the latest Dreamweaver if needed.

    Any help you all can offer would be greatly appreciated!

    Sam

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Everyone learns differently and some people need the structure of either classroom, or online self paced classes to keep them focused. Some people do better with trial and error, some people just deconstruct what others do and learn from that.

    That being said, there are probably a hundred threads of this same exact question and they all have varied answers... What it basically means is, where to go from here is completey up to you...

    If you want to focus on design, there are a few things you want to learn like graphics stuff, js, jquery...

    If you want to focus on development different stuff, PHP, asp.net , Ajax, jquery ...

    There are very few people that are really good at both, but it is doable... All depending on drive , self discipline, desire... The design stuff comes easily to some, where others struggle...

    You have to know what your strengths and weaknesses are and when to either to find a good book for more detail, or where to find answers.

    I wouldn't completely discount classroom training unless you've been there and found it completely useless... I've set in on some classes in the past, and as an observer, I found it interesting the that teacher was more interested in promoting herself and her skills to the class, than actually teaching. The reason I was ask to sit in, was more paying students were complaining that they were not even being taught the basics, but were being encouraged to attend higher level classes taught by guess who, the same teacher.

    Sometimes online courses are pretty good, they can challenge you into learning more.

    Now... That I've not really given you a straight answer, let me ask you why you want to go into this industry ? What is your end goal, once you're able to offer design/development services ? What are your financial goals with this ? I know lots of people that think they can make tons of money "freelancing", and after starving and struggling to learn the craft,

    At least if you take a certificate course, you have that and might be able to get some entry level work to pay the bills until you build up you base.

    Just a thought

  4. #3
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    Doing this on your own .... as a sole business will be tough. But if you were proficient at one aspect, you could become part of a team.


  5. #4
    Senior Member bleau canon's Avatar
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    If you're interested in ASP.NET, Microsoft has a free version of Visual Studio Express 2012 for web that works great and has some good tutorials in it. We use the pro version of it.

    http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/eng/downloads

    They're also giving Expression Web 4 away for free now due to the development of a new program to pretty much cover anything especially ASP.NET development. If you download EW4 be sure to have all the system requirements in place especially the Net Framework 4.0 installed first.
    EW4 is our editor of choice even though we still do some php in Dreamweaver.

    http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/downl....aspx?id=36179
    TheGAME1264 likes this.
    Bleau
    "Give the gift of life, Adopt a child, And an Animal"

  6. #5
    Member sstjohn's Avatar
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    The best way (I have found being mostly self-taught) is to reverse engineer the work of others...namely, templates. Try to get your hands on as many free resources as you can. Things like user login scripts, image sliders, jQuery, javascript, PHP based contact forms, etc "plug-ins" (I put that in quotes because you can't just "plug" them in by dragging and dropping. You have to know where all the pieces fit to make them work and inject them into the page yourself). That being said, by having to figure it all out (and hopefully the creator will give at least a little tutelage), you won't even realize it, but you'll be learning! Books and online tutorials are another great resource. Also, spend time in forums! Good luck to you!

  7. #6
    Senior Member Andrew Yurlov's Avatar
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    Everyone here has amazing answer's so I don't know if mine will make any difference lol. If you want to learn static front end design you will need to know

    HTML(5)
    CSS(3)
    Javascript
    jQuery

    If you want to learn backend database stuff you will need...

    PHP / ASP.NET
    mySQL
    possibly Javascript
    and more..

    I would just say go ahead and use notepad++. Thats what I have been doing for the past 4 years. If you want to learn from books, make sure to get the latest versions because with this field of work books tend to get outdated VERY fast. Get books around 2010 - 2013.
    Artificial intelligence is nothing compared to natural stupidity -Someone

    Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks.
    But of course, if you dig deeper, itís really how it works.
    -Steve Jobs



  8. #7
    Member DigitalYak's Avatar
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    HTML and CSS are must, drop in some JQuery, Javascript and PHP and you'll be fine. I use Dreamweaver but any text editor will be fine for your needs, as far as training is concerned, have a look on YouTube and vimeo first before buying books as there is a lot of free tutorials out there for beginners.

  9. #8
    Member Nathan Wilkins's Avatar
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    When at college I started using Dreamweaver. I now detest that program! Learn the HTML basics and then start using CSS. I then proceeded to learn the basics of PHP and Javascript. That's how much I know which is not a lot. Some say Javascript is easier to learn than PHP which I do agree but because PHP is a server side language it's very useful for validation whereas Javascript is client side. It's good practice to learn both
    Nathan Wilkins Web Design - www.nathanwilkins.com
    "I create Simple and Stylish Websites"
    'Like' facebook.com/NathanWilkinsWebDesign

  10. #9
    Junior Member
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    Hey Samuel,

    I've kind of in the same position as yourself. I did a week's course a little while ago using dreamweaver, I think, but I've started to re-learn just using notepad.

    I have found the website www.w3schools.com has all the information I have needed so far. I've also topped this up with podcasts and vids from various sites. I've found Anna Debenham (maban.co.uk) very informative.

    Hope this helps


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