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Thread: Starting out

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    [SIZE=15px]Hi, I'm just starting to learn HTML and CSS at the moment. Hopefully, I can turn design and web design into a full time job. I'm just after people's opinions on the best path-way to this. I'm using notepad and the minute and designing using a web browser. I'm wanting to learning coding from scratch. What are people opinions on this? I've heard lots of comments on 'beautiful coding' on different sites - Can anyone define this? I think that's it for now... I have an opportunity to build a website for a friend (a simple one-pager) to I want to the best job i can, and then move onto my own! Cheers[/SIZE]

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Well, everyone learns differently so what you are attempting is not completely out of the question. The thing is, it can be a long and sometimes frustrating road for some.

    Again, everyone learns differently. Some like and need the structure of a classroom to be able to focus, others can read and retain necessary things from books, while others can look at other people's do completed work and deconstruct it. Me personally, a combination of looking at others work and books works best for me.

    The only problem I see with your approach is you should have a good basic understanding and grasp of the basics so that you know what you're looking at IS the correct way.

    I've deconstructed so many sites over the years that when I see the code I say " what the heck were they thinking when they did it that way".

    And this industry is not for everyone. Some struggle with the concepts behind things, some get the basics but never quite get the more advanced aspects of it.

    It is however a constant learning experience, I've been doing it about 15 years and I see and learn news things on a regular basis. Some people don't appreciate the constant change, but in this industry its a given, and expected.

    You can learn good basics from sites like http://w3schools.com and http://html.net

    Notepad is fine, but there are plenty of free tools like notepad++ , metapad, etc... That have some built in features that you might find helpful.

    Beautiful code... Ok... That's a subjective term... Some people
    Consider semantic code styles beautiful, others just follow standard coding practices ... You will have to define that yourself.

  4. #3
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    Hi,

    Thanks for your response.

    Yeah, I've seen W3Schools - I've found some very useful tips on there, but I've heard mixed reviews about some of the more in-depth info (w3fools.com). I'm using Jon Duckett's HTML&CSS book and .net mags and stuff.

    I keep making little mock up and they seem to be improving every time.

    I'll check out notepad++. I've heard people mention it, but I didn't think it was too different from standard Np.

    There are a few established companies in my local area making some nice websites, so once I'm a bit more proficient, I was hoping to get some voluntary work to gain some professional training...

  5. #4
    Senior Member Kayo's Avatar
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    My personal favourite website to learn from is HTMLDog.com. It's a little outdated now because it's still living in the world of XHTML. However, I noticed a link to the side that says they are going to have a major revamp soon, and it will include newer concepts such as HTML5 and CSS3.

    I also took advantage of my free access to Lynda.com while I was at school. But it's so good that I think it's well worth the monthly fee. I would be doing it right now if I wasn't busy with other stuff.

    The big decision is when you completed HTML, CSS and Javascript. From there, the road forks and there are so many directions to go. Some stop right there and become a designer. Others go learn a server side language like PHP, Ruby, Java, ASP.net. From there, you could learn a new framework. I found Ruby on Rails to be the easiest route, but if you are planning building a website that house ten of thousands of connections, you will hit some problems.


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