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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Hey there guys, I'm actually a new website designer trying to get projects, got any tips?

    Im actually trying to get work on elance, but im faced with a dilemma every time i apply, these questions always pop up in my head:


    1.) Do i need to inform the guy that i am an entry-level programmer?
    2.) I have no idea what clients usually ask programmers to do.
    3.) If its not stipulated whether or not they want SEO, is it a requirement for me to do SEO? or should i just not bother with it.
    4.) Do i need to bid extremely low?

    Thanks in advance! any tips would be greatly appreciated

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  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    1) Yes. There's no point in lying about it. You're going to get found out.

    2) Depends on the project. If you're a good programmer, then you'll be asked to do all sorts of things, but mostly along the lines of, "I have this problem. Solve it."

    3) If you're building the site, you should be working the elements of SEO into the site as you go, as many of the elements of SEO are also design elements (consistent navigation, clean code, proper use of tags and attributes, etc.)

    4) If you bid low, you'll find cheap people. The problem with cheap people is that they're among the biggest a-holes on the planet. They figure that because you're willing to do one thing cheap, you'll do everything cheap, and ideally for free. You'll have no one to blame but yourself when you run into these people, either.

    So...no.
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  4. #3
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    There's tons of tips on this site, but one of the best is to have a contract that stipulates what you will and won't do, what happens if something needs to be added outside of the parameters of the contract (is it a separate project, is it per hour, etc), what happens if you're late with the project (or they're late with paying you), etc.
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  5. #4
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Personally, if you're skills are entry level you might be better off doing some pro bono work for a non profit to help give you some experience, not only in design, but also in dealing with businesses and organizations in general.

    By doing some volunteer work, you get to also build a "working portfolio", of sites to show potential client in the future, as well as many of these non-profits will write a letter of recommendation for you if you actually deliver on the project. Both you and they benefit from this arrangement.

    I don't know about elance ( I've never used it as a designer or someone hiring someone ), but part of MY REQUIREMENTS, when considering a person to do work for me or clients, is to SEE some previous work to determine skill levels or at the very least progression of skill levels.

  6. #5
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    Whenever I suggest this to beginners they always ask why they should learn to code HTML when we have programs like Dreamweaver and FrontPage that do it all for you? The short answer is that they don't, at least not all the time. While these programs are very useful (and I highly recommend that all web page designers learn to use one), they do have their limitations where it can be easier to hand code the HTML yourself. If you don't know HTML, this can be a problem. You don't have to learn everything there is about HTML, but you should learn the basics and some key tags that are used all the time:

  7. #6
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    Thanks for all the tips guys! i found them to be very helpfull,

    Quick Question though, instead of doing pro-bono, would it be rewarding if i created templates/designs and coded them, with the objective of making them sell-able ? like if i coded a design for a construction company, and actually tried to sell it, but of course offering the option for me to customize the design of the site to fit the needs of the customer.

  8. #7
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    Wait that came out wrong, it sounded as though i wanted to resell the designs i made for a company. to another company

    Let me try to explain more,

    Err. i believe a step by step is necessary

    1.) Code a site (for no-one)
    2.) Post it on my portfolio site
    3.) Sell the design to a customer and customize it to fit their needs.

  9. #8
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Wouldn't hurt to try it. It's been done to a point, but in your case, you'd have the edge of owning the template (you built it) and the ability to sell exclusive rights to the template (which is something most templates don't have going for them).
    Richard Abear likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  10. #9
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    Aight man, thanks

  11. #10
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Or... Do both.. The mention about pro bono work wasn't just to get experience designing... That's just one part of it. Doing web design for a non profit gives you valuable "industry business experience". Most will provide some valuable "references" that help build your credibility. And getting some real world experince without the pressure that comes along with some paying clients. Non profits tend to be very appreciative of the fact you are doing this for free and less critical of your lack of experience.

    Web design is so much more than just making pretty pages. Many people getting into this industry think its all about sitting behind their computer and just "designing"... But like any other business, there's a lot more to it than we might think there is looking at it from the outside.


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