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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Need some help and guidance

    Hello there,

    I posted a thread on this forum not too long ago saying 'I need serious help building an ecommerce site'. Just to recap I am an apprentice, who is here to build an ecommerce site for the company. I have only over built one website previous to this and all my experience and training beforehand was in IT Support and becoming a technician.
    My boss has asked me to build an ecommerce site to sell wholesale on, and build the website completely from scratch. However, discussing this with other people on websites, such as this. I decided to explain to him that this would be way to difficult in the time frame I was dealing with. So instead we are building a magento site to start with just to get some revenue in and put our products out there. Then in the background I am building the full version custom built in the background with a much longer time frame than was previously decided before.
    I have started to now learn PHP and jQuery, while also bucking up on my HTML and CSS even more. I have started looking into courses at colleges and university to do with web design, graphics etc. As this is something I'm really becoming interested in.
    I just wanted your guys ideas, is this the right route to go down or should I go down a different route? Really as well how did you get into web design any guidance or tips would be greatly appreciated

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  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    I got into it by playing with things and building sites as a hobby. I built one particular site for myself, it took off, a former boss heard about it and became my first client. Now, keep in mind that this was back in 1999...there were no college or university courses available for web design and development back then, and if there were, they'd be pretty clued out.

    With that said, this may or may not have improved from the standpoint of a newcomer since then. I've looked at university / college courses the odd time and, while they offer me very little to nothing that I'd actually need or want to know and that I couldn't pick up on my own, they may be of some use to newcomers in the field.

    Hypothetical scenario: if I were in my late teens or early 20s and I knew what I did about the education system and nothing about web development or design, I would probably look toward a private college first. I don't know if you have these in the UK, but we have places like CDI College here in Ontario that are privately owned and operated. They're generally less expensive and more importantly focus more on the pragmatic elements of programming. I'm not sure if this is true now, but way way back in the dark days of the early 90's when I went to high school, we were taught programming concepts using a language called Turing. Now, if you haven't heard of Turing before, there's a good reason for that...its primary purpose was to be used in high schools to introduce students to programming. Turing has, to the best of my knowledge, no real-world applications. I took a semester of university courses and found more of the same, except that we were taught using an educational version of Think Pascal...once again, no real world application. We were learning theories.​ Theories are important, you know!

    My point? If you're going to go down the "education" route, be sure that what you're learning will 1) be taught to you correctly and 2) have some use in the real world. So make sure you can learn PHP, you can learn Javascript, you can learn HTML, you can learn whatever, but with as little of the pointless filler as possible. I would suggest private community colleges would be more streamlined in this regard.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Some people need the structure of the classroom and a strict outline of learning to actually gain something. Some learn more at their own pace and based on their desire and drive, they can learn much more in the same time period. Others prefer to take self paced but very structured courses .... And sometimes when life gets in the way, this is a good option.

    Back when I started, there were no classes or courses, and what little was on the Internet at the time was just the basics of HTML, I was intrigued by a NEW web technology at the time called "light script" ( perhaps mis-spelled), it only caught on a few years later when it was re-branded or re-named JavaScript.

    anyway, I've been a student in "design classes", an observer and curriculum advisor at several colleges, and the common detractor I've run across is because there are so many ways to do things, most instructors focus on the basics and structure... Very few actually focus on "best practices", and unlike most programming courses, design is more of an interpretive "the ends justify the means" mentality... Which basically translates ( in my opinion ), a small percentage of the class will gain beneficial skills, the rest learn to teach themselves how to teach themselves... And a few will gain the understanding that this is something they really don't want to commit the time to.

    i learn and have always found that "de-constructing" and breaking down other people's logic... In design, to be the most useful to me learning tools. I have amassed a library of scriptlets I've written over the years, so when I start a project, it only takes a short time to pull all the pieces together. My biggest reference tool now, google... Once you know and understand the logic, its just simply asking the right question to get the answer you need.

    with all the online resources, an aspiring designer, with the drive to learn can do pretty much anything they put their mind to. If you don't need the structure of a classroom.

  5. #4
    Junior Member
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    Hi thanks for your guys input.
    I have decided to take a look at a few university classes and college courses and have an interview with them, over the next week. In the meantime I am going to pretty much learn as much as I can on my own. I taught myself how to play the guitar so I definitely know I can go down this route myself but of course any help would be of much appreciation and maybe this will speed up the process and also keep me motivated.


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