Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By TheGAME1264

Thread: differences between software developer and web developer?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    31
    Member #
    38393

    differences between software developer and web developer?

    For my future career, I want to become either a software developer or a website developer.

    the problem is that I cant see the differences between them.

    I know that software developers develop more OS based and software based using code, and web developers design and develop websites with codes.

    1. Is that the only differences?

    2. to become a web developer I heard you get a web develop degree in computer science. What do I get to become a software developer? is there a specific kind of degree?

    3. are the types of codes software developers use and web developers use the same? (HTML, CSS, Java, Rubi etc)

    4. I'm very interested in designing websites, and even when I go to a college for software development, I want to be able to design websites for friends and family members for their needs. If i learn the things for software development from a school would I still be able to design and develop websites?

  2.  

  3. #2
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,482
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    1) Pretty much.

    2) Computer science degree will generally do the trick. It's not the degree that matters, though...it's what you learned while getting it and how applicable it is. I'm not sure if this true now, but way back when I went to school in the dark ages of the 90's we learned how to program using such wonderful languages as Turing and THINK Pascal. The sole purpose behind Turing at the time was to act as an educational-only programming language (in other words, there were no real-world applications for it) and if I recall correctly THINK Pascal was in the same boat. So be aware of this when you pick out courses for yourself, learn from my mistake, and make sure you're studying things you can potentially use in the short run. If a language or framework is rendered obsolete in the long run that's not within your control, but at least learn something you might be able to use as opposed to something you won't be able to use.

    3) Depends on the frameworks and languages taught. Most languages and frameworks use some combination of sub procedures, functions, classes, etc. This allows for reuse of code, multiple execution options depending on variables of a programmer's choosing, and other things.

    HTML is somewhat unique in that it's a markup language. There really isn't any "programming" in HTML per se. It's interpreted in a linear manner, much as you'd read a book or an article. The code associated with most other frameworks and languages doesn't have to be linear; it can be organized by the programmer however (s)he wants.

    4) Conceptually, yes. Practically...see #2.
    bleau canon likes this.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    31
    Member #
    38393
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264 View Post
    1) Pretty much.

    2) Computer science degree will generally do the trick. It's not the degree that matters, though...it's what you learned while getting it and how applicable it is. I'm not sure if this true now, but way back when I went to school in the dark ages of the 90's we learned how to program using such wonderful languages as Turing and THINK Pascal. The sole purpose behind Turing at the time was to act as an educational-only programming language (in other words, there were no real-world applications for it) and if I recall correctly THINK Pascal was in the same boat. So be aware of this when you pick out courses for yourself, learn from my mistake, and make sure you're studying things you can potentially use in the short run. If a language or framework is rendered obsolete in the long run that's not within your control, but at least learn something you might be able to use as opposed to something you won't be able to use.

    3) Depends on the frameworks and languages taught. Most languages and frameworks use some combination of sub procedures, functions, classes, etc. This allows for reuse of code, multiple execution options depending on variables of a programmer's choosing, and other things.

    HTML is somewhat unique in that it's a markup language. There really isn't any "programming" in HTML per se. It's interpreted in a linear manner, much as you'd read a book or an article. The code associated with most other frameworks and languages doesn't have to be linear; it can be organized by the programmer however (s)he wants.

    4) Conceptually, yes. Practically...see #2.
    oh I see. thanks for the answer!
    and you know how there are different programs for each degrees?
    for computer science from a university i looked into had web development program, software engineer program and other CS programs.
    Do I just choose from one of them?

  5. #4
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,482
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    Pretty much, yeah. You might be able to do a double major or something like that, but again...evaluate both the web and software development programs based on "can I use the stuff they'll teach me in the real world?"
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  6. #5
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cottage Grove, Minnesota
    Posts
    7,772
    Member #
    5580
    Liked
    723 times
    CS programs like to deal with native languages like C++, JAVA, COBOL, etc. Web Development is more in line with "scripting languages", like PHP, Perl, ASP.net, etc.

    They are related though. ANY kind of program is valuable and related to everything just for the fact that it's "programming". You need to learn the commands, structures, functions, program flow, program "visual white space, indents", and how the programs work together in exchanging data and database control.

    I learned BASIC and C++ back in 1977-1986. PHP wasn't on my list until 2005, and I also dabbled with Perl.

    So even though I never had a Computer Science course or any development courses, by learning programming skills, it's easier to pick-up on any language.


  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    31
    Member #
    38393
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264 View Post
    Pretty much, yeah. You might be able to do a double major or something like that, but again...evaluate both the web and software development programs based on "can I use the stuff they'll teach me in the real world?"
    oh.. then all that's left for me to do is to choose between software development or web development. I see the differences in them but I don't know which are harder.. maybe I'll take some classes online for web development through codecademy.com and codeschool.com and software development through different websites and see which one would fit me better.

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    31
    Member #
    38393
    Quote Originally Posted by mlseim View Post
    CS programs like to deal with native languages like C++, JAVA, COBOL, etc. Web Development is more in line with "scripting languages", like PHP, Perl, ASP.net, etc.

    They are related though. ANY kind of program is valuable and related to everything just for the fact that it's "programming". You need to learn the commands, structures, functions, program flow, program "visual white space, indents", and how the programs work together in exchanging data and database control.

    I learned BASIC and C++ back in 1977-1986. PHP wasn't on my list until 2005, and I also dabbled with Perl.

    So even though I never had a Computer Science course or any development courses, by learning programming skills, it's easier to pick-up on any language.
    If I go to a college or university, do I just choose a language I want to learn? I heard I just have to learn one of the three (C++ , C# or Java).

    also where did you learn those languages?

  9. #8
    Senior Member bleau canon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Appalachia Blue Ridge Mts.
    Posts
    612
    Member #
    27201
    Liked
    191 times
    Two examples I know of:

    Software developer friend
    Now owns his own software company and develops programs for businesses in Atlanta. Lives in a beautiful home down there and has money to spend.
    Owns a $850.000.00 vacation home on top of a mountain near us. They have two kids in college..everything is paid for and has no debt.

    Web designer friend in Atlanta that is tops in her class:
    Lives in a modest home with bills she has to pay, Has one kid in college and nothing is paid for,

    Just my 2 cents worth tonight.
    Bleau
    "Give the gift of life, Adopt a child, And an Animal"

  10. #9
    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Cottage Grove, Minnesota
    Posts
    7,772
    Member #
    5580
    Liked
    723 times
    I think you'll learn multiple languages. In fact, it will go in-depth beyond programming.



Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:21 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2020 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com