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  • 2 Post By Ronald Roe

Thread: How does selling a web design service work?

  1. #1
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    How does selling a web design service work?

    Hi, I was wondering about starting to do a little web design while i'm in high school to earn a little extra money. I am just confused about a few things when it comes to selling a web design service. What do you give to the client at the end? A finished website complete with a domain, web host, etc.? Or just the html/css files? Would anyone take someone who is in high school seriously? Also, could you get away with just knowing html and css? Or is javascript or something similar necessary? I'm sure i could learn javascript for web design, as I already know how to program, but i would rather just stick to html and css.
    If anyone could point me to a post somewhere or just reply in the comments answering these questions or with some advice in general, that would be fantastic. Thank you very much.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Vapr_Arts's Avatar
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    Id say Javascript is a requirement for the most part now. You could get away with knowing html and css but your going to be drastically limited to what jobs you can take. Most require at the very least an understanding of jQuery (which is a javascript library). With that said, i hate to say it but even just knowing these 3 languages are slowly starting to become "not enough" sites are starting to require databases and a server side language like php. This isnt a HUGE problem just yet and shouldnt discourage you but it is starting to be the norm in websites.. Think of how many sites have a login feature.. Requires a db and a server side language to work.. Same for forums and other things.

    The end product, or what you give to the client all depends on what they need from you. You can have them set up the hosting and domain name, just sending them the files, or you could take care of that and include that in the overall fee. Depends on how involved you wish to be.

    Before you ask be aware that we cannot discuss pricing on the internet because it is for one against the law but it also differs from the individual doing the work AND the individual work being done.

    You can be taken seriously, as long as you have work to show. Create your own site.. Do a few personal projects that you can show potential clients and if its good enough you will probably get the job.


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    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    ... be aware that we cannot discuss pricing on the internet because it is for one against the law ...
    I've never heard of that before.


    Whatever you can learn, whether it's javascripting or PHP ... will be beneficial to whatever you decide to do. Programming skills will be valuable to you no matter what career path you take. Kudos for diving into it, even if you don't make much money. Learn it.
    Last edited by mlseim; Sep 26th, 2014 at 11:05 PM.


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    Senior Member Vapr_Arts's Avatar
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    How does selling a web design service work?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlseim View Post
    I've never heard of that before.


    Whatever you can learn, whether it's javascripting or PHP ... will be beneficial to whatever you decide to do. Programming skills will be valuable to you no matter what career path you take. Kudos for diving into it, even if you don't make much money. Learn it.
    I was curious why multiple forums had this rule.. So i googled it. It was created before the internet to prevent professionals from fixing prices. I tried to google it right now and cant find the exact article i read. Ill try and find it for anyone interested in reading it.

    Was along the lines of an antitrust law. Its illegal to discuss pricing with competitors.

    Regretfully sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk during lunch and other breaks
    Last edited by Vapr_Arts; Sep 27th, 2014 at 01:51 AM.

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    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    There's nothing specific to web design as it pertains to discussion of prices. The closest thing you could be talking about that I can think of is collusion, and the law on collusion will vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Personally, I don't see this as an issue, as there are several freelancer sites where freelancers post their hourly rates. There are also comparison shopping sites and manufacturers that set up territorial exclusive rights and/or set prices right on the products so that retailers can't alter the price (e.g. books...the price is stamped right on the book, although some retailers will offer sales on used/discontinued books). As far as I'm concerned, go ahead and discuss pricing.

    As far as Ryan's question is concerned, you probably could make a little extra money while in high school...emphasis on little. HTML/CSS coders aren't in high demand, even when they're good. Add Javascript and ideally a server-side language to your repertoire.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264 View Post
    Add Javascript and ideally a server-side language to your repertoire.
    Could you give me an example of a good server-side language to learn? And would it be difficult to learn if I already have a base knowledge of programming (I know java). Also, with the server-side language, am I still able to just send the client the files for the website? Or does that require the whole domain/hosting thing which i am not too keen on doing as I am not too familiar when it comes to that portion of web design.
    And thank you to everyone's help and advice. I really appreciate it.

    And, Vapr_Arts, would you recommend me learning all of javascript? Or would jQuery be enough?
    Thanks again,
    Ryan

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    Senior Member Vapr_Arts's Avatar
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    Id recommend learning as much as you can.. Learn jQuery and use that to understand javascript.. Thats how i leanred.. We well as some online tutorials/lessons on codecademy..


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    Senior Member Ronald Roe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hosfordryan View Post
    would you recommend me learning all of javascript? Or would jQuery be enough?
    jQuery is a good way to get your feet wet with DOM scripting. It's how I eventually learned JavaScript.

    You said you already know Java. That means you should already know the fundamentals of programming. It also means, and I mention this with a huge caveat, that you know some of the JavaScript syntax and principles. The caveat is that Java != JavaScript in any way. They do, however share similar C-like syntaxes, and are very object oriented, though JS is more obsessively so. I mention all of this to say that it should be a fairly easy transition.

    JS is a little different in that it's event-driven. You tell it to either find something or wait for something, then do something with it.

    I say get a handle on JS first, then move to the back end. 2 reasons for this.
    1. PHP is quite similar to JS. Similar enough that it's easy to pick up once you know JS.
    2. With NodeJS, you can actually use JS on the back end instead of learning a whole new language.

    But to answer this specific question, never be content to do something halfway. Start with jQuery. There's nothing wrong with that, but learn JavaScript as a language as well.
    Last edited by Ronald Roe; Sep 28th, 2014 at 07:32 AM.
    Vapr_Arts and AlphaMare like this.
    Ron Roe
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