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Thread: american developers

  1. #1
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    american developers

    according to the American disabilities act (ADA), your site has to be available to the disabled community, i.e. blind, deaf etc...

    so my questions are, are you aware of this act? does it cause much problems when designing a site?

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  3. #2
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    I'm reading through the rules now they seem quite ridiculous and I doubt many sites actually adhere to them

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    Senior Member Ronald Roe's Avatar
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    The only sites this is enforced on are government websites
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  5. #4
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Actually, that's not totally true, Ron. Target was the subject of an ADA-related class action lawsuit back in 2008, and arguably got off quite lucky.

    https://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/target-case-study

    I'm not an American...eh? However, I am aware of the ADA and the even more nebulous UK Equality Act 2010. Why am I aware of these? I'm aware of strange things. The problem with the ADA, and what you're likely running across, is that it was written almost 30 years ago. As a result, many of the rules and regulations associated with it were written with brick and mortar business in mind and not so much the Internet. What I would suggest you do is start here:

    https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/

    And then strip it down to its simplest form. Basically, what accessibility comes down to is "can a user with a disability still use your site"? Contrast ratio is a key. Alt attributes (not tags!) are another. Not relying on colo(u)r, sound and/or images alone to convey a message is another. Oh yeah...and don't **** people off by playing background audio.

    In other words, it's nowhere near as complex as The Regulators of the Worldiverse would have you think.
    busso likes this.
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    WDF Staff mlseim's Avatar
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    Americans should abide by the recommendations, but I would say almost nobody does. Just looking at only the "alt" and "title" tags, most are not defined, or defined with just a meaningless placeholder. The blame can't really be put on everyone, because many sites are not made by developers or designers. They are made by "pre-canned" templates and "dummy-build" web page services.

    I can only speak for myself that I can do better too. I'm guilty of not even thinking about it when I program or modify sites for clients.

    But there is another thing ... not just websites. Pop-ups and ads and too much "noise" crap on a page causes problems.

    See how frustrating this is for a blind person:


    Of course, the UK is leading the way with RSLB Conversational Internet.
    IBM The Conversational Internet - A project that enables people who are blind to 'talk' with web pages - United States


    On the topic of blind people, this guy (Tommy Edison) is the most famous YouTube blind person with his own channel. What a great guy ... and you'll learn everything you need to know about being blind:
    https://www.youtube.com/user/TommyEdisonXP
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Ronald Roe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264 View Post
    Actually, that's not totally true, Ron. Target was the subject of an ADA-related class action lawsuit back in 2008, and arguably got off quite lucky.

    https://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/target-case-study
    Did not know that. In fact, that crap "web programming" teacher I've told you so much about was the one who told me it only applied to gov't sites.

    This should not be taken as though I don't think people should follow the guidelines. I try to the best I can, at least for screen readers and readability.
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    Ron Roe
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  8. #7
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Roe View Post
    Did not know that. In fact, that crap "web programming" teacher I've told you so much about was the one who told me it only applied to gov't sites.

    This should not be taken as though I don't think people should follow the guidelines. I try to the best I can, at least for screen readers and readability.
    Few people do, to be fair. It wasn't exactly widely publicized. I can't even remember how I found out about the case. But yes, it can and does apply to everyone...but, like a large percentage of laws, is enforced with all the consistency of a budget cell phone provider's Internet connection.

    I tend to believe that the more "liberal" countries, states/provinces, and other jurisdictions will begin enforcing these rules more stringently over the next 5-10 years as they'd make for an easy cash cow while appearing to fight for those with disabilities. As a result, i do what I can to head them off at the pass...and because it's a good practice.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

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