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  1. #1
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    My site validates as xhtml strict apart from the use of target="_blank" on some thumnail images. Is there a way to get a link to open a new window whilst keeping my code xhtml strict? I'd rather not have to resort to xhtml transitional if I can help it.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member glyakk's Avatar
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    This article deals specifically with this issue..
    Accessible Pop-up Links: A List Apart


  4. #3
    Senior Member jlgosse's Avatar
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    Javascript.


  5. #4
    Senior Member justlivyalife's Avatar
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    Glyakks' suggestion shows a way to do it using Javascript, and this is the simplest way to do it as far as I know.
    justlivyalife - The future depends on what we do in the present. (Mahatma Gandhi)
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  6. #5
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    I'm coding a site and thought I'd see if I can make it xhtml-strict and without using scripting (I've lost count of the number of articles on standards I've come across that resort to javascript). I've decided to ignore opening links in blank windows (from what I hear the W3C don't approve anyway!) in favour of a link back to the previous page.

    Thanks for the suggestions anyway!

  7. #6
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    Actually I think that it's stupid to make things XHTML strict, because: yes, it's very nice to put a badge saying "This site is XHTML strict, yeah!" but it's useless because most of the "browsers" (Mozilla is a browser, Opera is a browser, IE is a "browser") are unable to show strict things correctly, and you have to recur to complex and stupid hacks. Just stick with transitional, until strict gets the mainstream (which I can't see unless Gates does something about IE, and releases IE7 with Longhorn or something)

  8. #7
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    it's very nice to put a badge saying "This site is XHTML strict, yeah!"
    I will in no way, nor have I ever put a 'this site validates as xhtml-strict' badge on any site. I don't shout web standards from the highest mountain like a lot of others. I'm only making my site xhtml-strict in an attempt to better my understanding of xhtml and standards.
    most of the "browsers" are unable to show strict things correctly, and you have to recur to complex and stupid hacks.
    Trouble is that IE renders a lot of css/css positioning incorrectly whether it's strict or not. IE likes bad coding and tables. Using css and xhtml will always throw up problems in IE and I've managed to solve any problems so far without invalidating my code. Even if I invalidate my code with hacks, it would be nice to know the 'proper' code is correct.

    It works like this: be as neat and tidy, standards compliant, accessible as possible, then resort to hacks if absolutely necessary. Even if I use transitional, I'll try to be as compliant (neat and tidy) as I can - I'm trying to learn good habbits.

  9. #8
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    Sure, you can have tidy code, but I mean:
    What's the purpouse of having a strict site, when 80-90% of the users won't be able to use it correctly?
    Yeah, you will learn how to make things correctly, but actually, the challange of web design is not do it correctly like they teach you at any course you can take about that, but it's to create web design that is viewed as it was supposed to be on the maximum number of combinations of systems and browsers.

    That is, you can learn perfect super w3c correct XHTML in one day, but it will take you much more to learn the hacks and work-arounds of the techniques.

    I try to make things transitional, but my priority is to make things **work**. I already know how XHTML is

  10. #9
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    Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear!!!!

    You clearly don't understand. Browser testing is my number 1 priority. I just want to be able to write good code which works on most browsers (no-one can write code that works on ALL browsers) without using scripting (if I can help it) and only resorting to hacks where necessary (as I have done in the past). So far my code works on Mozilla, Opera, IE 5-6 (after some tweaks)and Safari. My next goal is to get it working on Mac IE - if I need a hack or two then I'll use them.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jedy
    Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear!!!!.

    What I'm trying to tell you is that just by writing STRICT code instead of TRANSITIONAL code, you are already putting difficulties to multi-browser design, thus meaning that you will have to use more nasty hacks


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