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  1. #1
    Senior Member krystof's Avatar
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    People here have advised me to be more "correct" so I am trying.

    I would like some opinions on the following "borderline" codings that are frequently denounced in articles. Are these officially "deprecated"--or are they just "less meaningful"?

    <br>&nbsp;<br>


    One article uses this as an example of "undesireable" practices that are made unnecessary by CSS. But I still find it useful.

    Now about <b> and <i>. I understand these are "unsemantic" but often the use of bold or italics IS unsemantic. For example:

    "I agree with George Bush but I don't think America can afford his foreign policy."

    Is there any reason to use the code <strong>but</strong>? No. You are flagging the search engines that this text is about but which is ridiculous, not to mention "unsemantic."

    On the other hand, this of course is a different matter:
    "I agree with George Bush but I don't think America can afford his foreign policy."

    In this case <strong> would be appropriate.

    ...but are <b> and <i> actually "deprecated"? (If so, then I guess I must change to <span style="font-weight:bold"> instead of my non-semantic <b> etc.)

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    <b> and <i> are not depricated in the least. They simply hold different meanings than their counterparts <strong> and <em>

    Here's the breakdown:

    If you are emphasizing, or meaning to highlight specific phrases, you should use <strong> or <em> because that's what it is. This is a very <strong>strong sentence</strong> because I really want to <em>emphasize</em> what I mean.

    However....

    Let's say you are quoting from a Magazine. Usually you would reference it in some way like "In People magazine..." This would be a perfect usage of <i> because you are not emphasizing the text, but rather italicizing it due to the MLA guidelines. Same goes for bold, etc.


    However: bottom line: Does it really matter?

    No. With the rare exception that you are publishing a site that reviews literature and cites it properly, and your site happens to be targeted towards people that view-source and the blind (screen readers interpret <b> and <strong> differently).
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Eddy Bones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krystof
    ...<span style="font-weight:bold">
    That's less semantic that <b>...

  5. #4
    Senior Member krystof's Avatar
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    Thank you Kyle! I appreciate the time you spend here.

    I know you are picky, so I am very reassured that you agree with me that <b> and <i> are "alright." This has been bugging me for months. (Constantly reading otherwise in website articles.) Your definitions are a bit different from mine--and probably more "correct." But like you say, doesn't really matter.

    Any opinions on <br>&nbsp;<br>?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddy Bones
    ...<span style="font-weight:bold">...That's less semantic that <b>...
    ...Eddy I agree with you 200%! Nonetheless constantly reading otherwise in website articles...

  6. #5
    Senior Member Fallout's Avatar
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    I would just use <br /><br /> if anything... theres no reason for a space in there that I know of.

  7. #6
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    &nbsp; is more-often used as a hack than anything else. I can't think of a situation at the moment where you would need a non-breaking space in a newspaper article or magazine column.
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  8. #7
    Senior Member krystof's Avatar
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    Thank you for the reassurance Fallout and Filbert.

    I suspect this <br>&nbsp;<br> business comes from using WYSWYG editors. Sometimes they don't show the break unless you put a space. And maybe some old browsers were like that. But I guess I can leave out the space now!

    By the way, found an excellent article about <b> vs. <strong>. Goes a bit far to the opposite view from most, but this is refreshing and he certainly seems to know something:
    When Semantic Markup Goes Bad

  9. #8
    Senior Member raspberryh's Avatar
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    I use &nbsp; in an empty table cell so it doesn't 'collapse'.
    choosy developers choose gif!
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