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  1. #1
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    I can code just fine. I'd need to do some serious refressher stuff. but i know jtml and c++(or used to) so i need to make a comercial website were i can make orders and stuff. But i never did anything like this im looking for some help. Should i use some kind of dreamweaver thing. or do hardcore html.

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  3. #2
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    At it's most basic level, you setting up a shopping cart system could just be some checkboxes and a drop down/textbox for the quantity.

    So you could whip it up in 10 minutes or so.

    However to handle transactions needs more than HTML, as you will be dealing with credit cards I presume.

  4. #3
    Member goldfish's Avatar
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    Hardcore HTML isn't the problem. Personally the best websites I've made have been with notepad, but you can't beat a nice code editor with syntax highlighting, with some version control, for speeding development of a web app.

    You can write a shopping cart system in notepad - I've done it - but other programs have nice workflow optimisations like automatically updating a CVS/SVN repository when you need it to, giving you quick links to global database connections, code/tag completion (that can be annoying though), built in code validation - all that good stuff - that can speed you up a lot.

    However if you were intending to use Dreamweaver to write a shopping cart without ever looking at code - WYSIWYG style - that really isn't going to happen. The nearest you can get to that is to use ASP.NET 2 with Visual Studio (Express version is free). And even there you can't do anything particularly interesting unless you write some code yourself. And then that restricts you to using a Windows server with .NET v2.0 and IIS 6 running.
    Goldfish
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  5. #4
    Senior Member jbagley's Avatar
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    Fully agree with you goldfish.

    I actually use Dreamweaver as my text editor. I never view my sites in dreamweaver, just use the code view, which as all the functions etc tied in. Notepad really sucks IMO. Its not supposed to be used as a development tool.

  6. #5
    Member bil2k's Avatar
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    I use DW too, I toggle between code view and design view frequently. Design view is mostly helpful for quickly navigating to a specific portion of your page in code. It's site management stuff is useful too.

    Also Dreamweaver 8 includes some neat enhancements from MX 2004 but nothing killer IMO.

  7. #6
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbagley
    I actually use Dreamweaver as my text editor. I never view my sites in dreamweaver, just use the code view, which as all the functions etc tied in. Notepad really sucks IMO. Its not supposed to be used as a development tool.
    100% agree. Notepad is worthless, as are all "coders" who swear by it. I use Dreamweaver frequently, but nearly always in the Code view, not Design view.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
    Site of the Month contest: submit your site or vote for the winner!

  8. #7
    Member goldfish's Avatar
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    Notepad isn't worthless. It works. True, not very well, but it works. If you are sitting on a computer in the middle of nowhere and all you have at your disposal is paint and notepad, you can make a reasonable website. It won't be the prettiest thing in the world, since paint is very restrictive, but providing you know your stuff notepad won't limit your creativity.

    I used Dreamweaver as a code editor for a long time. On my linux laptop I use Nvu. These days I prefer using Notepad++, which has syntax highlighting and the capacity to add plugins like HTMLTidy (which I've never really got working properly to be honest). The truth is that if I'm flicking around a site in Windows Explorer, I don't always want to be running two hefty applications like Photoshop and Dreamweaver, especially when I hardly ever use the majority of the features in Dreamweaver. It makes more sense, for me.

    That's what it all comes down to - your personal preference. If you can code at the speed of light with Dreamweaver, then what's the point of using anything else? If you can code without needing wizards or menus to tell you what your code says so you can edit it by GUI, then why use a big IDE?
    Goldfish
    Blueshadow Multimedia

  9. #8
    Senior Member minute44's Avatar
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    Using notepad to code HTML is like toasting bread with your living room gas fire. It'll do the job but there's things that will do it better because that's not what it was made for.:lick:
    No ma'am, we in IT don't have a sense of humor we're aware of.

  10. #9
    Member goldfish's Avatar
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    I'd say it's more like using a campfire. Since it isn't intended to do something specifically different. A living room gas fire is specifically designed to heat a room (or just look pretty, depends what kind). Using Word to write HTML would be like using your living room gas fire. A campfire isn't specifically designed to do anything, other than be alight.
    Notepad is a raw ASCII text editor, so a more appropriate comparison.
    Sorry, pedantic I know.

    Either way, it's not what you'd call a development environment. As for doing things better - well, better all depends on the specific task you are undertaking, and how your workflow is set up.

    In the ideal scenario, every persons (X)HTML editor would be different - customised to their work patterns. But, of course, that's not how it works out. The better apps let you customise their layout to an extent, but you will almost always find little blips of things that could work better for you.
    Goldfish
    Blueshadow Multimedia


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