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  1. #1
    Junior Member mouse_'s Avatar
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    I have a question, way back we chated about using the switch $_GET for doing a page like index.php?action=about but a friend of mine said he was using the %_SERVER["QUERY_STRING"] to do this with multi &'s and ='s lol how is this done exactly? or is there a turtorial about it? :ninja:

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  3. #2
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    I'm not really a PHP expert, but here's what I can tell you:

    $_SERVER is a collection of variables pertaining to the current page, which is stored on the server. You can also use $HTTP_SERVER_VARS (backwards compatible) to access the collection.

    The correct usage would be:

    PHP Code:
    $myVar $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'];

    or 

    $myVar $HTTP_SERVER_VARS['QUERY_STRING']; 
    They are:
    • 'PHP_SELF' - The filename of the currently executing script, relative to the document root. For instance, $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] in a script at the address http://example.com/test.php/foo.bar would be /test.php/foo.bar.
    • 'argv' - Array of arguments passed to the script. When the script is run on the command line, this gives C-style access to the command line parameters. When called via the GET method, this will contain the query string.
    • 'argc' - Contains the number of command line parameters passed to the script (if run on the command line).
    • 'GATEWAY_INTERFACE' - What revision of the CGI specification the server is using; i.e. 'CGI/1.1'.
    • 'SERVER_NAME' - The name of the server host under which the current script is executing. If the script is running on a virtual host, this will be the value defined for that virtual host.
    • 'SERVER_SOFTWARE' - Server identification string, given in the headers when responding to requests.
    • 'SERVER_PROTOCOL' - Name and revision of the information protocol via which the page was requested; i.e. 'HTTP/1.0';
    • 'REQUEST_METHOD' - Which request method was used to access the page; i.e. 'GET', 'HEAD', 'POST', 'PUT'.
    • 'QUERY_STRING' - The query string, if any, via which the page was accessed.
    • 'DOCUMENT_ROOT' - The document root directory under which the current script is executing, as defined in the server's configuration file.
    • 'HTTP_ACCEPT' - Contents of the Accept: header from the current request, if there is one.
    • 'HTTP_ACCEPT_CHARSET' - Contents of the Accept-Charset: header from the current request, if there is one. Example: 'iso-8859-1,*,utf-8'.
    • 'HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING' - Contents of the Accept-Encoding: header from the current request, if there is one. Example: 'gzip'.
    • 'HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE' - Contents of the Accept-Language: header from the current request, if there is one. Example: 'en'.
    • 'HTTP_CONNECTION' - Contents of the Connection: header from the current request, if there is one. Example: 'Keep-Alive'.
    • 'HTTP_HOST' - Contents of the Host: header from the current request, if there is one.
    • 'HTTP_REFERER' - The address of the page (if any) which referred the user agent to the current page. This is set by the user agent. Not all user agents will set this, and some provide the ability to modify HTTP_REFERER as a feature. In short, it cannot really be trusted.
    • 'HTTP_USER_AGENT' - Contents of the User_Agent: header from the current request, if there is one. This is a string denoting the user agent being which is accessing the page. A typical example is: Mozilla/4.5 [en] (X11; U; Linux 2.2.9 i586). Among other things, you can use this value with get_browser() to tailor your page's output to the capabilities of the user agent.
    • 'REMOTE_ADDR' - The IP address from which the user is viewing the current page.
    • 'REMOTE_HOST' - The Host name from which the user is viewing the current page. The reverse dns lookup is based off the REMOTE_ADDR of the user.
    • 'REMOTE_PORT' - The port being used on the user's machine to communicate with the web server.
    • 'SCRIPT_FILENAME' - The absolute pathname of the currently executing script.
    • 'SERVER_ADMIN' - The value given to the SERVER_ADMIN (for Apache) directive in the web server configuration file. If the script is running on a virtual host, this will be the value defined for that virtual host.
    • 'SERVER_PORT' - The port on the server machine being used by the web server for communication. For default setups, this will be '80'; using SSL, for instance, will change this to whatever your defined secure HTTP port is.
    • 'SERVER_SIGNATURE' - String containing the server version and virtual host name which are added to server-generated pages, if enabled.
    • 'PATH_TRANSLATED' - Filesystem- (not document root-) based path to the current script, after the server has done any virtual-to-real mapping.
    • 'SCRIPT_NAME' - Contains the current script's path. This is useful for pages which need to point to themselves.
    • 'REQUEST_URI' - The URI which was given in order to access this page; for instance, '/index.html'.
    • 'PHP_AUTH_USER' - When running under Apache as module doing HTTP authentication this variable is set to the username provided by the user.
    • 'PHP_AUTH_PW' - When running under Apache as module doing HTTP authentication this variable is set to the password provided by the user.
    • 'PHP_AUTH_TYPE' - When running under Apache as module doing HTTP authenticated this variable is set to the authentication type.

    (The above list is from http://www.php.net.)


    The main difference between $_GET (or $HTTP_GET_VARS) and $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'] is that $_GET is a collection created from the QUERY_STRING, which splits it into keys and values. You can then retrieve any value by invoking its key, i.e. $_GET['key']. Alternatively, $_SERVER is a collection of server variables. The QUERY_STRING is only one of the values in that collection, and therefore can only be retrieved in whole. You must then parse it on your own.

    Hope that helps !!!

  4. #3
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    Make sure you have PHP 4.2.0 or higher because those superglobals are only available in that version. Also never use stuff like $HTTP_POST_VARS (versus $_POST) because those superglobals are deprecated; only superglobals like $_ are supported now
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  5. #4
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    Nice addition. I meant to say only use the $HTTP_ stuff only in older versions.


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