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  1. #1
    Senior Member bluntknife's Avatar
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    Hiya,

    Looking around my room I realised that I have enough to build a (albeit crappy) spare PC to sit under my Bed or something.

    Looking around the site, and others, I find loads of people going on about their test boards / servers and how it helps them to Dev stuff.

    Basically, I was wondering whether any of you guys have any kind of 'local' 'server' and how you've set it up eg.

    • Running In The Background, On Another PC, or on a 'Headless' PC and remotely controlled?
    • Linux, Windows or Mac Server?
    • Running over a network or internet? (if applic.)
    • etc etc.


    Any comments would be great!!

    Cheers
    Ollie
    Hardly the sharpest thing in the drawer.
    Design | Life | Outdoors | Ryukin Radio

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  3. #2
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    Not really, unless your main computer is too slow or doesn't support Apache/PHP/MySQL's sysmem requirements.

    Linux would be best, although Windows is easiest to set up, followed by OS X. At work, I just run the trio on both my P4 and G4 (and I found out you can run an old version of Apache on Pocket PC ).
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
    Site of the Month contest: submit your site or vote for the winner!

  4. #3
    Senior Member Brak's Avatar
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    Well, right now I have my testing server on my main computer. Apache/MySQL/PHP/CGI. I've served sites off it for my network(dorm LAN) before, and it's never really affected performance (albeit there was little traffic). If you want to learn how to administrate servers I say give it a go. Linux/FreeBSD is the only way to fly if you've got your own box. But.... it's a complicated art and can result in much frustration. When I was doing the webpage for my school's cs server me and the guy runnin the server were working together to learn how to admin a server basically. And just so you know, we ended up deleting the MySQL tables 5 times over a period of about 7months It's no easy task if you want a real server.

    If you just wanna test stuff though, just read up on installing apache/mysql/php in the tutorials and be on your way (assuming you're running windows, if not I do believe there's a tutorial in there to get it working for Mac....) Your server wont be secure, wont be stable - but hell it'll work :P
    Kyle Neath: Rockstar extraordinare
    The blog | The poetry site | The Spore site

  5. #4
    Senior Member bluntknife's Avatar
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    Yep, sounds good.

    I was kinda thinking of a use for the PC.. i guess i could turn the monitor into an aquarium (SE+ Stylee) and use the CD drive as a coffee cup holder...

    hmm.. unprocessed fish sticks.

    I think I'll try running it in the background of my main PC... at least until a miracle happens and I get enough cash for my G4...

    Thanks
    Ollie
    Hardly the sharpest thing in the drawer.
    Design | Life | Outdoors | Ryukin Radio

  6. #5
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    Here at my office, we have about 16 rackmount servers in a cabinet that are controlled by a KVM. They are a mix of Windows 2000 / SQL Server machines, Linux / Oracle machines, and AIX / Informix machines. These are the primary environments that we develop on. We primarily use them for staging.

    We also have one really BIG server that's a quad P4 with 4 gigs of RAM. This monster is our Virtual Machine server, which has about 6-8 Virtual Machines running on it at any given time. These are used for testing, because new installations can be created in minutes by copying a pre-configured VM image with the necessary setup into your folder and loading it up.

    We also have various servers scattered around the office that our developers use for alpha testing the software and components they develop on a day-to-day basis.

    For the most part, we access our servers with Terminal Services or Telnet. If necessary, we will plug into them and access directly, though, or use the KVM if it's one of the servers on it.

  7. #6
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    Hi. Im a newbie at PHP/MySQL, and I have setup my computer as a server, and installed PHP/MySQL. However, recently I setup another computer for a server, and I find it works better. I dont like having all that installed on my computer and hogging my resources. So for me personally I find it works better setting up another computer to play with PHP. Hope this helps!

  8. #7
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    I find it convenient to test a script just by saving it and not having to FTP it to another server, but that's just me.
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
    Site of the Month contest: submit your site or vote for the winner!

  9. #8
    Senior Member james's Avatar
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    If you're developing with html, js, etc, Notepad and IE will do.

    If you're using flash or java, just add your flash or java making program to the list.

    If you're making server generated pages, ie php, asp or cgi, you'll need a server to do the work, but installing it locally is fine. It's web address is http://127.0.0.1 .

    For instance, if you install the apache web server, you just put pages into the htdocs directory, then you can open them locally and/or through 127.0.0.1. Then you install php as well, put a file in htdocs called test.php with:
    Code:
    <?php
    echo "<b>Test</b>";
    ?>
    If you open it locally, it'll just be a text file; If you open it through 127.0.0.1, it'll look like
    Test

    Then you're away. Then you can experiment with header and footer includes for a consistent site 'look', get and post vars, and maybe database stuff.

    I think you only need a test server if you're going into fairly hefty database stuff that will bog down your design computer. The advantage of installing a server locally is you don't have to worry about networking protocols and file transfers.

    Is that the answer you're looking for?
    James H
    Home Page · Mars Page · www.fihsf1.net (formerly www·fihs·net)

  10. #9
    JR
    JR is offline
    Senior Member JR's Avatar
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    you can also test php by using
    PHP Code:
    <?php
    phpinfo
    ()
    ?>
    which shows you all of your settings etc.
    JR

  11. #10
    Senior Member james's Avatar
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    Yes, that test file is quite a nice intro to php.
    James H
    Home Page · Mars Page · www.fihsf1.net (formerly www·fihs·net)


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