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Thread: Windows Server

  1. #1
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    I want to install Windows Server 2003 on a basic home server, including support for a domain controller. That means Standard edition (not Web edition, which lacks domain controller support). Given it's for personal use, the only computers that will connect to it are my desktop, laptop, and two or three other computers in the house.

    What should I buy? Link? Can I get by with just an OEM Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition disc, or do I need one with CALs included? For that matter, what is a CAL (client access license) and how does it apply to this situation? Would I need one CAL for each computer that connects to the server, one for each simultaneous RDC session...? It's completely unclear from what I've read on Wikipedia and Microsoft's own site.

    I'm guessing not a lot of people know about this...probably those who manage servers at a company do, though. The domain controller plus the (relative) simplicity of Windows Server 2003 nearly rules out using Linux.
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  3. #2
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    CALs are for devices and/or users. Device is defined as an individual personal computer, workstation, terminal, handheld computer, pager, telephone, personal digital assistant, or other electronic device. User is devined as an individual person.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...loverview.mspx

    Device-based or User-based Windows Client Access Licenses
    There are two types of Windows Client Access Licenses from which to choose: device-based or user-based, also known as Windows Device CALs or Windows User CALs. This means you can choose to acquire a Windows CAL for every device (used by any user) accessing your servers, or you can choose to acquire a Windows CAL for every named user accessing your servers (from any device).

    The option to choose between the two types of Windows CALs offers you the flexibility to use the licensing that best suits the needs of your organization. For example:

    Windows Device CALs might make most economic and administrative sense for an organization with multiple users for one device, such as shift workers.

    Whereas, Windows User CALs might make most sense for an organization with many employees who need access to the corporate network from unknown devices (for example, when traveling) and/or an organization with employees who access the network via multiple devices.
    Also read:
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/sam/lic_cal.mspx
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    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    But when they say "accessing your servers", what does that mean? Literally any type of connection to that server and any of its services, or something more specific?
    filburt1, Web Design Forums.net founder
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  5. #4
    Senior Member Arkette's Avatar
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    Given your situation, SE 5Cal is more than sufficient especialy as you can add blocks of Cals if your con-current sessions increase. Worth noting the con-current here. A Cal is required for any running user session irespective of what created it, but in reality this usually only applies to users who are accessing a server share, unless you are talking about WAN's where it can all get a little more complicated.
    End of Line.

  6. #5
    WDF Staff Wired's Avatar
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    In otherwords, read the last link in my post. It's even got pretty pictures.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    This is a far prettier picture:
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    I'm seeing GNOME. Nothing pretty about that. :-P

  9. #8
    Senior Member filburt1's Avatar
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    yast2 is screwed up somehow. I can open it, but as soon as I load any applet within it (the mail one, for this example), it will load, pop up with "Reading package information", and then just close with no message. It crashes with no message if run from SSH, too.
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