Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    55
    Member #
    31903

    Difference b/w hardware vs software load balancer

    Hi All

    Please share the difference b/w hardware vs software load balancer. Which one is best for server load optimization.

    Thank

  2.  

  3. #2
    WDF Staff veraderock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    172
    Member #
    28229
    Liked
    22 times
    Hi Vincewicks,

    The obvious difference is that one is software and so needs to be installed on a server. That server can be a variety of configurations so could be fast or slow, reliable or not. A hardware load balancer is a dedicated piece of hardware that you would install in your server rack. Keep in mind a hardware load balancer is running software which manages the load balancing, so really it's just specific hardware to best compliment the needs of load balancing.

    Now, if you have a trusty old unix server lying around (or any computer really that can have a *Nix installed on it), you can install open source free load balancing software (most Linux or BSDs these days come with one) and then just be sure you have multiple ethernet cards on yor box and you've got a load balancer for next to nothing. This will be as reliable as the hardware you're using, but you have the option of swapping out problematic ethernet cards, RAM, CPU, etc..

    For dedicated load balancers you're looking at more of an investment, but ideally will have a nicer interface and less operating system configuration to deal with.

    I've use CoyotePoint dedicated load balancers in the past, and they worked well, I've also used FreeBSD and OpenBSD servers as a load balancers without problems. Currently we use dedicated load balancers but I'm more in the development area then sysadmin now, so I'm honestly not sure which models we currently use.

    The question comes down to your budget, experience and the importance of your product. If you have the money to spend, dedicated load balancers are the way to go. But in a pinch, a dedicated server running load balancing software should be fine if you're able to configure it (depending on the hardware and traffic demands).

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    55
    Member #
    31903
    Thanks veraderock for your detail explanation. Can you suggest me the load balancing software for apache webserver with centos. My VPS always stuck with this load problem.

  5. #4
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,485
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    If it's a VPS that you're using, no load balancing software will work. You need to go to either a more powerful VPS or dedicated.

    Now, my understanding of load balancing is crude, but the one thing I do know is that it takes two or more servers to split the load among.

    The other question you want to ask yourself is if you're dealing with a company that's giving you full value for your VPS. If it's a company such as HostGator that has had issues in the recent past, you might want to look at a better VPS supplier. If your VPS is doing what it should be for you (e.g. if you're on a host such as Sectorlink that knows what they're doing), then you'll need to look at things such as your traffic and if there's something in one of your scripts that's abusing or leaking resources.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  6. #5
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina Coast
    Posts
    3,322
    Member #
    27709
    Liked
    770 times
    Yep, you've got the general concept correct.

    i have load balancers on all my servers and client servers, but they are for "teaming" and splitting the load across multiple network devices.

    i do have a sever rack at one location with 10 servers that are clustered, and I run a load balancer on them to spread the CPU/ ram/ storage and network resources tied to 2 IP addresses. Its a combo between hardware and software that does the balancing.

    unless a VPS has acces to multiple network devices or multiple servers, a load balancing anything is not going to benefit a VPS, unless of course they ( the hosting provider ) is calling something else a load balancer. But again, a single vps with a single network device or network connection ... No benefit or way to actually "load balance" anything.

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    55
    Member #
    31903
    Yesterday my VPS got down due to the huge load, my hosting provider advice me to upgrade the VPS configuration.

    Guys what I think is buy one more VPS do the load balance, Is it better way to manage the load or increase the present VPS RAM, CPU is enough?

  8. #7
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Not from USA
    Posts
    14,485
    Member #
    425
    Liked
    2783 times
    You should be able to increase your RAM and CPU and be done with it. That depends on how much of a load you're using, though. You still have a dedicated server as an option.

    Basically, you only want a load balancer when you've gone high-end dedicated and still are running out of resource.

    Again, have a look at your host as well. Make sure you're not dealing with a budget host and that their server doesn't have issues.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

    My stuff (well, some of it): My bowling alley site | Canadian Postal Code Info (beta)

  9. #8
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina Coast
    Posts
    3,322
    Member #
    27709
    Liked
    770 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Vincewicks View Post
    Yesterday my VPS got down due to the huge load, my hosting provider advice me to upgrade the VPS configuration.

    Guys what I think is buy one more VPS do the load balance, Is it better way to manage the load or increase the present VPS RAM, CPU is enough?
    It really all depends on what is "causing the load" situation...

    are you really getting that many visitors ? Basically, you should be able to look historically,'see the increase in traffic and correlate it with the load. Without the increase in traffic, there could be any number of reasons, but none should warrant an increased VPS... Unless its very low in resources anyway.


Remove Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

difference between hardware and software load balancer
,
hardware load balance vs sw load balance
,

hardware load balancer vs software load balancer

,

hardware vs software load balancer

,
load balancer hardware vs software
,
load balancer software hardware
,
software hardware load balancer
,

software load balancer vs hardware load balancer

,
software or hardware load balancer
,

software vs hardware load balancer

Click on a term to search for related topics.
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:52 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
vBulletin Skin By: PurevB.com