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  1. #1
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    Dear Forum,

    I am having a website developed. It is hosted on Godaddy. The developer says they cannot
    access the site through the FTP user name & passwords I have provided. They say the need
    all my passwords on the GoDaddy website to be able to set up the website they have created.

    I feel awkward about this. Godaddy recommends NOT giving out all my GD passwords. I tested
    the developer access using Filezilla and it is accessable. What is going on? What can I tell this
    developer in order to getthem moving without having access to my e-mail, credit etc info?

    Is this an issue with most developers?

    Thanks

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Noteleklabs's Avatar
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    I would recommend making SURE that he is credible, also to test if he is lying, make up a restricted account on ftp and give it to him over VOICE CHAT. or, just have him devolop it on his site, zip it up and send it to you.
    Hey you! Go make something!

  4. #3
    Senior Member Ronald Roe's Avatar
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    Since you're calling him a "developer", I'm going to assume he's created some sort of web app for you. Assuming that's the case, it's likely he'll need to set up database access for you. If so, he'll need access to GoDaddy's backend for your account. That is, unless you are comfortable trying to set up the database(s) yourself.

    If you aren't geographically separated, why not just have him come to you and you can log in for him?
    Ron Roe
    Web Developer
    "If every app were designed using the same design template, oh wait...Bootstrap."

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Roe, post: 242264
    Since you're calling him a "developer", I'm going to assume he's created some sort of web app for you. Assuming that's the case, it's likely he'll need to set up database access for you. If so, he'll need access to GoDaddy's backend for your account. That is, unless you are comfortable trying to set up the database(s) yourself.

    If you aren't geographically separated, why not just have him come to you and you can log in for him?
    We are geographically separated. I set up the app Wordpress database in GD, so I'll await what they say next. Thanks for your responses

  6. #5
    Senior Member Webzarus's Avatar
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    Godaddy has the option to setup additional "admin" account that you can invite someone to use.

    Once you send the invite, they will need to create their own account and login, if they already have a godaddy account, send the email invite to the email address thy use for that account.

    You may need to contact support once you invite him, as the portion about assigning privledges is tricky and can be confusing, but does work.

    Then when the developer is done with his thing, you just revoke his privledges.

    This protects you and him by going this route instead of sharing your account info.

  7. #6
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Normally, I'd agree with GoDaddy about the idea of giving away passwords. You don't want to give them away to just anyone.

    However, you've obviously hired a developer and are paying him to develop something. It's pretty unlikely that you've paid money to a developer unless you have some sort of ROI in mind i.e. you've paid the developer money to build something to generate you some sort of income.

    If you're going to trust your developer to do that, you should be able to trust your developer with your passwords. Yes, with trust comes risk, but that's a risk you should be willing to assume if you're willing to assume the financial risk.
    If you're not going to trust your developer with your passwords, then you've got a deeper issue with your developer. As a developer myself, I have access to multiple web servers that aren't my own and several pieces of highly confidential information. It's necessary for me to do my job effectively. So assuming your developer is legit, I can see where he's coming from.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

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  8. #7
    Junior Member WillyZ's Avatar
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    just change your password to something temp until the developer is finished

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Webzarus, post: 242267
    Godaddy has the option to setup additional "admin" account that you can invite someone to use.

    Once you send the invite, they will need to create their own account and login, if they already have a godaddy account, send the email invite to the email address thy use for that account.

    You may need to contact support once you invite him, as the portion about assigning privledges is tricky and can be confusing, but does work.

    Then when the developer is done with his thing, you just revoke his privledges.

    This protects you and him by going this route instead of sharing your account info.
    Thnaks, this soulds like the best solution I've heard so far!

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGAME1264, post: 242268
    Normally, I'd agree with GoDaddy about the idea of giving away passwords. You don't want to give them away to just anyone.

    However, you've obviously hired a developer and are paying him to develop something. It's pretty unlikely that you've paid money to a developer unless you have some sort of ROI in mind i.e. you've paid the developer money to build something to generate you some sort of income.

    If you're going to trust your developer to do that, you should be able to trust your developer with your passwords. Yes, with trust comes risk, but that's a risk you should be willing to assume if you're willing to assume the financial risk.
    If you're not going to trust your developer with your passwords, then you've got a deeper issue with your developer. As a developer myself, I have access to multiple web servers that aren't my own and several pieces of highly confidential information. It's necessary for me to do my job effectively. So assuming your developer is legit, I can see where he's coming from.
    Trust is often a function of what has happened to us recently in our lives. I'm really not sure that I want to give someone across the country access to my e-mail accounts. But thanks for the response.

  11. #10
    Unpaid WDF Intern TheGAME1264's Avatar
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    Yeah, that's true...it often is. Can't argue with that.

    But again, it is fairly common practice for developers to gain that sort of access. Using myself again as an example (just because it's convenient, not because of an ego trip), companies have granted me access to entire servers and even allowed me to order and build them, and in many cases I've never so much as sat down and had a coffee with the people I'm dealing with. In my particular case, I'm not even in the same country as several of them (I'm Canadian).

    WZ's idea does make the most sense, though. I'd go with it...but if you're really paranoid, talk to GoDaddy about backups, just in case. If you've got a dedicated server, then the optimal solution would be to have three hard drives in it...two for RAID1 purposes (drive mirroring, so that if one fails, the other can pick up and keep going because the exact same stuff is on both), and a third for backup purposes (I usually schedule backup jobs every 12 hours). There also also ways to back up offsite to a different FTP server (among other things), but I've found this works best.
    If I've helped you out in any way, please pay it forward. My wife and I are walking for Autism Speaks. Please donate, and thanks.

    If someone helped you out, be sure to "Like" their post and/or help them in kind. The "Like" link is on the bottom right of each post, beside the "Share" link.

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