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  1. #1
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    so last time I made a site and asked for opinions you said that my site wasn't colorful enough, this time it's got a little more color so lets see what you think now. This site is to sell an ebook, and I copied the formatting of some of the other ebook selling sites while trying to make this one just a touch more professional looking, but I would like to hear your opinions on it.

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  3. #2
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    Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

    ...It's wrong aesthetically, which is the only thing that passes for good design in many venues.

    ...It's wrong from the point of view of direct mail sales letter sites you're (trying) to emulate.

    ...And it's even wrong for the user perspective of trying to make the decision of which hearing aid to buy.

    Aethetically, the highlighting is a horror show. The image used isn't really integrated into the header design, which gives it a slapped-in look.

    Direct response dictates you ditch the aesthetics for business effective graphics. That means the only picture that matters is 1) Customers 2) Joyce groom. You don't have either.

    Worse yet, the highlighting is abused to the point of being obnoxious. Rather than use the highlight to emphasize benefits, you're using it for emphasis. This is a rooky direct response copywriter's error. The result is the reader instantly learns to distrust the usefulness of the highlighting for scaning through the offer.

    The bullet points are boring and not benefit driven. The copy does not seem to reveal anything important. Rather it gives the impression of generic freely available content scraped off the web and repackaged for sale.

    Worse yet, this lets down the user looking for good information on deciding which hearing aid to buy. And I say this from the standpoint of someone who was in the market for your exact product one year ago. I wasn't buying for myself, like so many in this market I was buying for a relative ...who wouldn't buy it for themselves.

    After all, the hard-of-hearing don't have a problem. Everyone else has a problem.

    -- Bolding, yellow highlight, aqua higlight: Pick One Edit the highlighting to one tenth the current amount and then shift to benefits

    -- Testimonials. Testimonials. Testimonials. Tone down the obnoxious effects on everything so you can draw attention to the testimonials when you highlight them

    -- Read a copywriting book, then rewrite the bullet points so they have 1) Benefits 2) "Cliff hanger appeal"

    For example, write something like "A good audiologist will make an inexpensive model work like a top-line unit, while a bad audiologist will guarantee you'll be back for a new unit in less than a year ...the one test you can use to tell the difference (page 117)."

    It's pretty much like that the whole way through. There was so much obnoxious visual clutter I had to hunt for the Click To Order button. That is deadly. Use visual effects to lead attention to testimonials and the order button, rather than everything else.

    Not one in twenty web designers knows how to use graphics to sell product. Pretty doesn't sell. In fact, when tested side-by-side with proper methodology pretty often does worse in pure results. Graphic artists simply assume the better looking site must naturally produce better results. They have no need to test, because this is simply a foregone conclusion.

    Read Why Your Website Doesn't Need To Be Pretty. Look matter quite a lot, just not the way graphic artists want it to.

    Which is why you should check out this long-form sales letter page. Hardly the best, and the subheads could be set much bigger. Still a full order of magnitude better than yours at layout, highlighting what you should highlight, and use of graphics to sell.

    Finally, consider an advertorial layout for this kind of page. It's a rarity on the web, but combines the selling power of online long-copy sales letters with the information customary for web articles. Rather than pointless graphics, you can then use infographics -- which should probably also be in the book.

    Check out the EdenPure advertorial page. It is practically unknown on the web that the graphics can actually be about the product and not pointlessly irrelevant fashion models pretending to be either customers or faux employees.

  4. #3
    WDF Staff smoseley's Avatar
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    DC, that's a very good analysis and lesson in what not to do. I don't think I can add anything.

  5. #4
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    thank you so much, DC, It's amazing to get actual feedback from people that matter rather than a client or friend that doesn't know anything. I'll work on all of those things you mentioned.

  6. #5
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    dc, my next site is a cosmetic dental website, I'm excited to see what you think about that one when it's done, i'm making more before and afters of real patients and real quotes from real people said about the practice. I'm taking your suggestions and working with them as much as I can. thank you so much.

  7. #6
    Senior Member entity's Avatar
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    Yes, I would say that that was extremely great feedback.
    And, as a sidenote, do clients not matter?
    I WILL rule the world someday.
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  8. #7
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    they matter, but their opinion usually stinks.

  9. #8
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    ...clients not matter?
    Remember clients have their own perception, and they have a certain reasoning about how their business works. You have to respect they know their own business.

    That said, client's know their business but not everyone else's. It behooves web designers to know competitor X is doing one thing, and competitor Y if very good with something elese, while competitor Z is vulnerable.

    You can't design a website in a competitive vacuum. I mean, you can, but the price for that is around $50 and a trip to templatemonster.

  10. #9
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    Many times a client doesn't know their target audience at all. If the client has been around their business so long, they are sucked into the corner of their understanding of their own business. When talking to potential customers they end up throwing in terminology that only they would use because it's common knowledge to them and it leaves the client confused.

    Example: A dental chair in a dental practice may represent happiness and money to a dentist, but for many of their clients, it represents fear and anxiety. The use of such imagery in a website will drive customers away, but the dentist may want pictures in there. People don't buy products, they buy services. If their teeth hurt, they don't want to go to the dentist, they want the pain to go away. To the dentist, they pay for time in their chairs. To the patient, they pay for a solution for pain.

    As each view sees different things, the client and their market may misocmmunicate very easily without understanding why. This is just one example, I'm sure there are more.

    I know that the client will know their business more than a web designer will, but I try to make websites that are more interesting for the client's target audience and not for the client.

    Oh, and just a plug for templatemonster. The only target audience those templates will captivate is 16-30 year olds. I often look at their designs to get ideas, but find myself just wasting valuable time because they are so far from optimized for sales. I once saw a physician's site on there with pictures of doctors with the paper masks over their face while holding needles. That's like a horror movie for a potential customer!

  11. #10
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    I once saw a physician's site on there with pictures of doctors with the paper masks over their face while holding needles. That's like a horror movie for a potential customer!
    Ah yes, but it was cheap.

    You're right, of course. The same people spend twenty dollars to save five bucks at a sale. Or save one million dollars on outsourcing their products abroad and lose fifty million from product recalls and bad press.


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